12 Radio Promotion Tips To Help Build Awareness For Your Band

Bobby Borg, author of Music Marketing for the DIY Musicianprovides promotion tips to help build band awareness in his latest article from Hypebot!

12 Radio Promotion Tips to Help Build Awareness For Your Band

Radio promotion is the process of soliciting your music to radio stations to get airplay, to build professional relationships, and to make fans. Are you getting the most out of your radio promotion campaigns?

College radio stations, web radio stations, satellite radio stations, and commercial specialty shows (the “locals only” type shows on commercial stations at the end of the week) are all great places to promote your music—especially when the Internet is overflowing with millions of other independent artists competing for attention.

12 tips to maximize your next radio promo campaign

1. Create a target station list of all radio mediums by using Radio-Locator (www.radio-locator.com), Indie Bible (www.indiebible.com), and Live365 (www.live365.com). Write down the station name, show name, DJ, contact information, submission policy, and “call time” (the time the DJ accepts calls). This should pretty much do it.

2. Prepare the proper materials for your campaign including a broadcast quality master (CD or MP3), a “one sheet” that includes important information (such as your name, picture, brief bio, and your accomplishments), and a short note or cover letter or email indicating your objectives for sending your music.

3. Call the station one week after sending your music to see if they received it and ask for feedback. Be prepared to call-back repeatedly to reach the DJ or music director. Also be patient and be extremely nice. This is a very important step in the process.

4. If your music gets played, send the DJ a ‘Thank You’ card for adding your music and let him/her know that you really appreciate his/her support.

5. Request positive quotes from the DJ about your music to use in your promotional packets and websites.

6. Schedule live station interviews and station performances.

Click here to read the rest of the article!

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6 Types of Music Promotion You Might Be Overlooking

Bobby Borg, author of Music Marketing for the DIY Musiciandescribes types of music promotion you might be overlooking in his latest article from SonicBids!

6 Types of Music Promotion You Might Be Overlooking

You’ve probably been told a million times by now that internet marketing (i.e., social networking, posting videos, getting reviews on blogs) is one of the most convenient and low-cost methods of promotion today. But it’s also a highly competitive space, filled to the brim with artists fighting for even the tiniest sliver of attention. Therefore, if you want to actually get seen and heard, it’s wise to even out your promotional campaign with a blend of both offline and online strategies. Are you overlooking these six effective methods of marketing your music?

1. Personal selling

Personal selling is the process of getting eye-to-eye with target customers and influencing them to act. It’s used when you have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with fans or business contacts to communicate the benefits of your products and ultimately make sales. Setting up “meet and greets” with your fans at local retail stores to promote your album or inviting a music supervisor out to lunch to discuss possible placements can produce tremendous results, especially if you’re charming, witty, talented, and a good salesperson.

2. Direct marketing

Direct marketing is a system by which organizations bypass intermediaries and communicate directly with end users to generate sales. It’s used when you have a well-targeted database of names and your target audience responds well to one-on-one communications. Snail mail, texting, and even telemarketing are all methods of direct marketing. On the latter note, when is the last time you went through your database of fans and personally called people to remind them about an upcoming show? You probably haven’t, and neither have many other bands – and that’s precisely why this method can potentially work well for you.

3. Radio promotion

Radio promotion is the process of soliciting your music to radio stations to get airplay, build professional relationships, and make fans. It’s used when you have master quality recordings, want to form solid relationships with DJs who are well-connected in your geographic area, and want to be broadcasted to potentially thousands of people in one spin. While regular-rotation commercial radio stations are a tough nut to crack, more viable mediums include college radio, National Public Radio (NPR), satellite radio, and commercial specialty shows (i.e., “locals only” type shows that air late night on weekends on commercial stations). Not only will the DJs play your music, but they can also arrange interviews, invite you to perform live on-air, and even announce your local gigs, contests, and news updates.

Read the rest of the article here!

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How to gig more without overexposing yourself

Bobby Borg, author of Music Marketing for the DIY Musiciandescribes how to perform more without overexposing yourself in his latest article from DiscMakers!

How to gig more without overexposing yourself

You should leave your fans wanting more, so if you want to perform live more than once a month, here are four strategies to fill up your performance schedule without saturating the market

To avoid overexposing your band in a market, you should limit your performances, perhaps performing once a month in your local territory and working hard to make each gig an explosive night to remember. The rule of thumb is quality before quantity, and leave your fans wanting more. However, if you desire to perform live more than just once every month, there are plenty of ways to fill up your performance schedule without saturating a popular market. Four basic strategies you should consider include:

  1. A club residency
  2. Alternate format performances
  3. Dual territory performances
  4. A tour

1. Club residency

In a club residency, a promoter will typically give an artist the opportunity to perform once a week or twice a month in his venue with the hope that the extra exposure will generate word-of-mouth promotion and build up local demand. This is an excellent opportunity to test material, work on arrangements and set orders, and gauge your songs’ impact on an audience — and it could be a situation where a promoter is forgiving of a partially empty club. But if you fail to promote effectively and fail to grow your crowd each week and keep up your end of the bargain, the club residency can quickly be terminated and relationship with the promoter forever damaged.

2. Alternate format performance

With an alternate format strategy, you perform two or three times monthly in a market, but you do it using non-competing formats of your music. For instance, an indie artist might play one club or territory with her full electric band the first week, and then do a more intimate acoustic solo performance in the same territory on the third week. This can be a pretty cool way to get fans to keep you at the top of their minds, and an excellent way of building a fan base by targeting different types of venues and catering to the people likely to frequent one type of club over another. However, you must monitor your audience and make sure your efforts are increasing attendance rather than creating competition between your own live performances.

Click here to read the rest of the article!

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The 7 Core Aspects of a Marketing Mix Every Band Needs

Bobby Borg, author of Music Marketing for the DIY Musiciandescribes core aspects of marketing in his latest article from SonicBids!

The 7 Core Aspects of a Marketing Mix Every Band Needs

While most bands are clear about what they’d like to achieve (getting more fans to their shows, selling more records and merch, and even getting signed to a label), some have a difficult time with strategizing how to get there. While there’s not one correct way to market your band, there are certainly a few core strategies you need to succeed. These include the “4 Ps” of marketing (product, price, place, and promotion) as well as three other important building blocks (band branding, product branding, and measuring). Let’s take a closer look at each one and see how you can start using them right now.

1. Band branding

This is the process of creating a unique name, logo, and slogan for your brand, and then stamping these elements on everything you do and have (e.g., your drummer’s bass drumheads, concert backdrops, guitar cases, and more). The idea is to create a positive and powerful perception of your band in the minds of the fans that is easily recognizable and very memorable.

2. Product branding

This involves creating album and song titles, packaging and set designs, and an overall personality that fits cohesively with your band’s brand. In other words, the identity of your band and the identity of your products should all make one cohesive statement.

3. Product development

This is the process of preparing your products for the marketplace by deciding whether to produce vinyl or USB flash drives, packaging your products together in a collector’s gift box, remixing one of your songs in another style, and so much more. The idea is to satisfy your target fans while creating a number of new revenue streams for your band.

4. Price

This involves making decisions about what to charge your fans for your albums, T-shirts, live performances, patches, and buttons. Considering your costs, knowing what’s reasonable to charge, and thinking about the image you want to project are all par for the course. Make no mistake – even when giving your products away for free, you must always let people know what they’re worth so that you can create the perception of value in your brand.

Click here to view the rest of the article!

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6 Tips to Crisis Management That Could Save Your Musical Brand

Bobby Borg, author of Music Marketing for the DIY Musicianprovides tips on crisis management in his latest article from Hypebot!

6 Tips to Crisis Management That Could Save Your Musical Brand

The saying “all publicity is good publicity” is not always true. A band must be prepared to deal immediately with certain rumors and unfortunate mistakes that may unfold and tarnish its brand image. Good news travels fast, but bad news travels faster. Inspired by business consultant and USC Professor Ira Kalb, here are six tips to crisis management that can help save your brand.

Unflattering Rumors

A rumor is information (usually unflattering) that is passed from person to person, but has not yet proven to be true. When an unflattering rumor circulates, you might consider the following:

1. Do not publicize the rumor by repeating it. Repeating it, of course, only helps to spread it.

2. Promote the exact opposite of the rumor by reminding people of all the good you do, but again, without mentioning the rumor.

3. Deal with the person(s) who started the rumor by letting them know you are upset and that you will even take legal action if necessary.

Click here to view the rest of the article!

Also, check out these other articles recently written by Bobby Borg:

Five Common Reasons Musicians Fail and What You Can Do About It

Damage Control: Effective Strategies for Handling Mistakes or Rumors About Your Band

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Listen: The DIY Roadmap with Bobby Borg

Bobby Borg, author of Music Marketing for the DIY Musician from Hal Leonard, sat down with Chris Aballo from C.A.P.E. for a great discussion about the business side of music!

>>LISTEN HERE<<

00124611There has never been a greater need for practical DIY marketing advice from a musician who has been there and succeeded than now – at a time when new technologies make it more possible than ever for musicians to attract attention independently and leverage their own careers, and record industry professionals look exclusively for developed artists who are already successful.

Written by a professional musician for other musicians, Music Marketing for the DIY Musician is a proactive, practical, step-by-step guide to producing a fully integrated, customized, low-budget plan of attack for artists marketing their own music. In a conversational tone, it reveals a systematic business approach employing the same tools and techniques used by innovative top companies, while always encouraging musicians to stay true to their artistic integrity. It’s the perfect blend of left-brain and right-brain marketing.

This book is the culmination of the author’s 25 years in the trenches as a musician and entrepreneur, and over a decade in academic and practical research involving thousands of independent artists and marketing experts from around the world. The goal is to help musical artists take control of their own destiny, save money and time, and eventually draw the full attention of top music industry professionals. It’s ultimately about making music that matters – and music that gets heard!

How to Deal With Negative Feedback on Your Songs

Bobby Borg, author of Music Marketing for the DIY Musiciandescribes how to deal with negative feedback in his latest article from SonicBids!

How to Deal With Negative Feedback on Your Songs

Getting feedback on your music from a representative sample of your target audience or a seasoned music professional is a great way to measure the progress you’re making. Everyone loves that extra boost of confidence, especially when it applies to something you created yourself. But what happens when you get feedback that’s the opposite of what you want to hear? Here are five tips that will help minimize the sting and turn it around into something productive.

1. Don’t get discouraged, get motivated

Remember that finding your true creative voice and sound –  not to mention an audience – requires a significant amount of time, patience, dedication, motivation, and work flow. It also requires that you do a great deal of experimenting, practicing, training, and creative thinking. Bottom line: it requires that you roll up your sleeves and work hard until you find the path that’s right for you. This isn’t meant to intimidate you, but rather to stimulate you. As AC/DC said in their famous song, “It’s a long way to the top if you want to rock ‘n’ roll.”

2. Use constructive criticism wisely

According to John Braheny, author of The Craft and Business of Songwriting, when the legendary songwriter Diane Warren (Whitney Houston, Faith Hill, Celine Dion) was still honing her craft and sorting out her style, she attended songwriting groups in Los Angeles. Every week following the critique sessions in which she received feedback, she returned with complete revisions of her songs with the utmost enthusiasm. She wrote hundreds of songs during this process. That commitment to continuous self-improvement, in addition to pure talent, luck, timing, and planning, was undoubtedly what led to her write over 50 Top 10 hits and achieve the feat of being the first songwriter in the history to have seven hits on the Billboard singles chart at the same time. Now that’s pretty impressive.

Click here to view the rest of the article!

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