Category Archives: Music Industry

Business Basics for Musicians by Bobby Borg

Bobby Borg, author of Business Basics for Musicians, discusses another key point that can be found in his book. In the video below you will hear him talk about business relationships with Aaron Mercier of the band, Kings of Carnage.Click play and let us know thoughts in the comments below!

00139915There has never been a greater need for musicians to understand the music business than now, when emerging technologies make it possible for artists to act as their own record labels, and new contracts are structured to grab the biggest slice of an artist’s revenue pie. But in a digital age overflowing with confusing and ever-changing information, musicians need trusted business advice from a veteran artist who can break down the basics in a language they understand.

The book not only covers legal aspects such as copyright and record contracts, it also shows to how to deal with the people involved along the way: band members, managers, attorneys, talent agents, and producers. Business Basics for Musicians will help musicians to faster navigate to success.

Steve Gordon and The Future of the Music Business

In the video below watch as Steve Gordon talks about his book, The Future of the Music Business, and how he keeps his book up to date thanks to his website. Click play and let us know your thoughts!

Visit Steve Gordon’s website HERE.

00123126New technologies have revolutionized the music business. While these technologies have wreaked havoc on traditional business models, they’ve also provided new opportunities for music business entrepreneurs, as well as new challenges for musicians, recording artists, songwriters, record labels and music publishers.
The Future of the Music Business provides a road map for success by explaining legal fundamentals including copyright law’s application to the music business, basic forms of agreement such as recording, songwriting and management contracts, PLUS the rules pertaining to digital streaming, downloading and Internet radio. This book also shows exactly how much money is generated by each of these models, and details how the money flows to the principal stakeholders: artists, record labels, songwriters and music publishers.

Alan Parsons discusses his Abbey Road lecture series at MusicRadar!

In advance of his lecture series at Abbey Road Studio, Alan Parsons author of, Alan Parsons’ Art & Science of Sound Recording, sat down with Tim Cant of MusicRadar.  Alan talked about his book (and the DVD set of the same name) and why he avoids using compression.


00333735Let’s get straight down to brass tacks. Tell us about your favourite desks!

“I think I’ve had the best luck with Neve, but having said that my biggest claim to fame, Pink Floyd’s //Dark Side of the Moon// was actually done on an EMI desk. I recently did an album with Stephen Wilson of Porcupine Tree, I did an album with him called The Raven That Refused to Sing and that was on a vintage Neve [RCA Custom 8028] Console at a studio here in California called EastWest, the same people that do the orchestral samples.”

Was there anything you particularly liked about that desk?

“Well, the opportunity is there to use external mic pre’s, that seems to be the way of the world right now, but I was perfectly happy to use the onboard pres most of the time. I’m a great believer in simplicity. It just complicates matters when you choose one mic pre for the kick drum, another one for the snare, a different one for the overheads…

“I just like to keep things simple. Having said that, my favourite mic pre which is also a limiter/compressor is the Universal Audio 6176… I’m looking at it right now. I’m also a big fan of the original dbx 160.”

Have you used the Universal Audio plugins?

“I use them all the time, I love their plugins, particularly their EMT plates! I use them on everything, any time I need reverb that would be my go-to.”

What about their range of compressors?

“I prefer to use external compressors and limiters. I tend to avoid compression and limiting, I never compress mixes, and I only ever usually limit two things: vocals and bass.”

Records are mastered very loud these days, so if you’re not compressing at the mixing stage the mastering engineer…

“I resist even letting the mastering engineer limit or compress. I mean, maybe just a dB of brickwall limiting for the peaks but otherwise no, I’d much rather leave it alone. If the consumer says it isn’t loud enough, turn it up! Do you think records sound as good as they used to?”

No.

“Absolutely. The level war is the worst thing to happen to audio in years. Interestingly though there has always been a level war, even on vinyl.”


Read the rest of the interview over at MusicRadar!

Confessions of a Serial Songwriter

Shelly Peiken, author of Confessions of a Serial Songwriter, coming in March from Applause Books, has given us an insight into her journey of making her book a reality on her blog at shellypeiken.com. It wasn’t an easy journey and it certainly wasn’t quick either but that hasn’t stopped her from making it happen. Take a look at what she had to say about her journey, below!


COASS-Final_CVR_152159We songwriters are like children. We start talking about things way too early. Like a new tune that P!nk might record or an upcoming single. When we’re excited about something we just can’t help it. It’s in our nature.

For instance, I’ve been yapping about my book “Confessions of a Serial Songwriter” for over a year now.  When I embarked on my journey I had no idea what I was doing or how to even get started. Much like how I felt when I wrote my first song. Stumble. Fall. Get up. Stumble again. Keep going. All I knew is that I was confused by a changing music business and I felt a need to write about it and tell everyone that I was doing so.

Well, I thought sure I’d have the book out by last March but was humbled to find that the completion of a book is a lot more complicated than a 3 minute song. You keep thinking you’re finished. But you’re not.

When I thought I was finished for the fifth time, I sent my manuscript into Backbeat Books, a publisher whose passion is music, songwriters, musicians. I felt sure Backbeat would be the perfect home for my story.

Crickets.

So I went on to Plan B: I’d find an agent who could make proper introductions to publishers. Of particular interest to me was a woman whose name I’d seen credited in several music related publications: Ronny Schiff. But Ronny had no website. No Facebook Page. She was un-findable. Next!


Read the rest of her story over at her blog, Shellypeiken.com/blog

Michael Beinhorn on Recording Studio Rockstars!

Michael Beinhorn, author of Unlocking Creativity was a guest on the Recording Studio Rockstars Podcast, hosted by Lij Shaw.  They spoke about his book and his career as a music producer, Beinhorn also talked about his experience working with artists such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Korn. Listen to the full podcast below!

>>LISTEN HERE<<

00122314Here, record producer Beinhorn reveals how to deal with interpersonal issues record producers face when they work with artists one on one or in small groups. The situations and solutions are based upon the author’s personal and professional experience working with a variety of different artists, such as Herbie Hancock, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Soul Asylum, Hole, Soundgarden, Ozzy Osbourne, Courtney Love, Marilyn Manson, Social Distortion, Korn, and Mew.

Beinhorn’s unique methods and perspective, applied to record producing and music making in the studio, opens the door to successful collaborative efforts. The author shows you how to find what he calls your sensory connection to the creativity process, which ultimately helps you find the intent behind your creative choices. You can read dozens of articles and books that feature a hundred different people talking about what microphones they used when they recorded Record X or how they set their stereo buss compressor, but you will never find out what prompted them to make these choices. Beinhorn’s focus on collaborative effort enables record producers and artists to find solutions while working as a creative team.

This perspective is especially valuable as it is transdisciplinary and can be applied to many occupations and modes of creativity outside of record production.

What Will the Music Business Look Like in 2020?

Bobby Borg, author of Business Basics for Musicians, is back to give us some new insight on the music business! It’s impossible to actually know what the future holds for any of us, but in this blog post from Sonicbids, Bobby Borg has some predictions from music industry professionals.. Check them out below!


So, what can we expect in the year 2020? Let’s see what this group of attorneys, music publishers, managers, and music industry entrepreneurs had to say.

001399151. Copyright laws will catch up with new trends and technologies

“Several trends have emerged and will continue to emerge as the music business evolves into a service-based business. More and more people are tuning in to all-you-can-listen streaming programs like Spotify and Rdio.

“In this same vein, younger fans want all of their content to be accessible on all of their devices, but do not care whether they own the content or not. They also want the opportunity to interact with the music they listen to, be it through remixes, mash-ups, or fan videos on YouTube. Unfortunately, our copyright laws are antiquated and do not allow these trends to develop.

“Over the next five to 10 years, I think we will see an overhaul of the United States’ copyright system. I also expect to see artists further expanding their brands into nontraditional revenue streams. Soon, fans will be able to surround themselves almost entirely with their favorite artists through branded products, multi-media projects, and other avenues we have not even begun to explore yet.” – Dina LaPolt, LaPolt Law, P.C.

 

2. Focus will shift to exciting music – not the latest technical trends

“Good music will always be the future, whether it be 2015, 2020, or 2025. When jazz arrived on the scene, it was controversial, exciting, and real – as was rock, rap, and EDM. It propelled the business forward and gave it life. But what’s next?

The year 2020 must be marked by a new direction in music that shakes up the world and puts the focus back on the art and the creators – not on the latest technical trend. Who cares about downloads, streaming, or whatever new technology is invented? In 2020, music will shine again! Those who create something unique will thrive.” – Mike Gormley, LA Personal Management; former manager of the Bangles, Oingo Boingo, and Danny Elfman


Read the rest of the article over at Sonicbids.

Bobby Borg is interviewed by Chris Aballo!

Bobby Borg, author of Business Basics for Musicians: The Complete Handbook from Start to Success, was interviewed by Chris Aballo! Chris Aballo host a podcast called C.A.P.E. (Chris Aballo’s Podcast Experiment) he was able to ask Bobby Borg all about his new book, and topics such as management and touring. Click the link below to hear what they had to say, then let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

>>LISTEN HERE<<

00139915There has never been a greater need for musicians to understand the music business than now, when emerging technologies make it possible for artists to act as their own record labels, and new contracts are structured to grab the biggest slice of an artist’s revenue pie. But in a digital age overflowing with confusing and ever-changing information, musicians need trusted business advice from a veteran artist who can break down the basics in a language they understand.

Written by a professional musician for other musicians, Business Basics for Musicians is the layperson’s guide to the music industry. In a conversational tone and an easy-to-scan format, it simplifies five vital areas in which musicians need to succeed: Career Execution, Business Relationships, Pro Teams, Deals and Dollars, and Future Predictions. Everything from copyright to record deals, managers, merchandising, and doing it yourself is covered.

The book not only covers legal aspects such as copyright and record contracts, it also shows to how to deal with the people involved along the way: band members, managers, attorneys, talent agents, and producers. Business Basics for Musicians will help musicians to faster navigate to success.

Bobby Borg looks inside his new book, Business Basics for Musicians

Bobby Borg, author of Business Basics for Musicians, sat down to talk with independent artist, Lisa Ciaccio to talk about the art of getting things done and other key points from in his book. Check it out!

00139915There has never been a greater need for musicians to understand the music business than now, when emerging technologies make it possible for artists to act as their own record labels, and new contracts are structured to grab the biggest slice of an artist’s revenue pie. But in a digital age overflowing with confusing and ever-changing information, musicians need trusted business advice from a veteran artist who can break down the basics in a language they understand.

Business Basics for Musicians is the layperson’s guide to the music industry, written by a professional musician for other musicians. The book not only covers legal aspects such as copyright and record contracts, it also shows to how to deal with the people involved along the way: band members, managers, attorneys, talent agents, and producers. Business Basics for Musicians will help musicians to faster navigate to success.

With interviews, anecdotes, and review quizzes, this guide will help artists master business essentials quickly so they can get back to doing what they love best – creating music.

Interview with Lisa S. Johnson, the woman behind 108 Rock Star Guitars

Lisa S. Johnson, author of 108 Rock Star Guitars, was interviewed online on Guitar Girl Magazine, where she talked about her book and the amazing pictures featured in it. Read what she had to say in the excerpt below!


00127925V: We’re here with Lisa S. Johnson, who has just released the book, 108 Guitars

L: 108 Rock Star Guitars!

V: Yes, rock star guitars– nothing that isn’t in that realm! So, what made you interested in just shooting guitars rather than guitars, drums, etc.? Do you play?

L: I grew up in a musical family; my father plays multiple instruments, and my mother is a singer, a country western singer, I grew up on country western, and then my brothers and sisters who are all older, they were into classic rock.  And so I listened to that with all my friends. I had a country background and a classic rock upbringing, with some blues and jazz as well. Then I ended up going to school for photography, and I ended up working for Eastman Kodak. I wanted to be a photographer; I ended up working for Kodak. All us reps at Kodak, we were all aspiring photographers; we all wanted to be photographers, and we all had access to as much film as we wanted.  So we were always shooting films and testing films to make sure we understood our products, and we could sell them to our photographer clients, and I was in and working for Kodak in Memphis Tennessee, and I started dating the guitar player at church.  My father told me growing up I was not allowed to date musicians, so I called my dad up and said “Dad, I’m calling to confess, I’m dating a musician, however, he is the guitar player at church and he owns a vintage guitar store, that’s his business”. So Dad said, “Oh, well, that’s different, he’s not a touring musician; he owns a vintage guitar store, huh? If he ever gets in a Gibson mandolin, I’ve always wanted one; let me know.” So two weeks later, he gets in a 1917, mint condition, Gibson mandolin. And I said to him, “I want that for my dad, how much?” He said, “You can’t afford it, but if you photograph some guitars for me, that I have to sell that I don’t want to sell, I’ll trade you for the mandolin.”  Now at that time I was shooting objects; I was studying the films, and I was shooting objects, and I was hand coloring them. At the time Kodak had a new film out called Kodak TNXP3200 that had grain, beautiful grain, and we had a new paper that had come out that was specific for hand tinting images, so I was practicing, experimenting with that, and so that’s what he was talking about, ‘I want you to photograph some guitars for me, like you do these objects, and hand color them and I’ll trade you for the mandolin’. So that’s how I fell in love with photographing guitars, at that point. Then I would go into his store, and I’d bring home any guitar I wanted, these beautiful, vintage guitars. One of the first ones I shot was a Fender paisley telecaster, and not long after that Kodak transferred me to New York City, and I thought, you know, every photographer needs to have a niche, something that they have a strength on, and so I thought, well, my signature imagery is going to be guitars.  And I may as well photograph famous ones, if I’m gonna do it, so Les Paul performed every Monday night at the Iridium Room in New York, and I went down there; I used to go by myself, and they had a bar in the back, in the old-school Iridium Room, the original one, and I’d go back and I’d sit there, and I got to know his bass player, his fiddle bass, stand-up bass player, and I said, “Do you think Les would let me photograph his guitar?” and I showed him images that I’d been doing in Memphis, and he said “Let me ask him.” And Les came back and said yes, and twelve years later, he wrote the foreword for my book, 108 Rock Star Guitars.

V: Proof of ‘who knows, when you ask…?’

L: That’s right; you gotta ask.

V: Now, has your filming changed over the years; have you gone to digital or do you still use the hardcore film techniques..?

L: I transitioned to digital; having worked for Kodak, of course I’m a film person- I love film.  It’s just that the digital process is so much more efficient and easier, and faster…! What’s cool about this book is that not only is it historic in that it captured all these historic guitars, it’s also historical in that this was project that took 17 years to complete. And 15 years of it was shooting, then assembling and creating the book. So for 15 years, I began with film, I transitioned to the new digital, I got screwed on a couple of photo shoots because the digital technology wasn’t really there, or so good in low light situations, and I was always shooting in low light situations backstage, so I learned, though, about digital, and then, now- I always was Nikon and went to Canon for a few years- and then I’ve just recently switched back to Nikon DE 810, it’s phenomenal, and I still use my same lens I’ve been using for years.

V: It’s a signature for you now?

L: Yeah, I love that lens; it’s a 35 to 72 8 f-stop lens, and it’s got a macro setting on it,  so I can move in on the subject, and that’s what I do; I photograph the wear and tear details of the guitars that personify the artists without them being in the picture.  How their pick hits the pick guard, how Keith Richards’ skull ring etches out in the pick guard, you know you can’t see that unless you get up close and personal with the guitars, so that’s what I do. I look at life that way, as close-ups; I like to look close at things and so, I do photograph the whole guitar; I also hone in on the details.


Read the rest of the interview over at Guitar Girl Magazine

Bobby Borg talks Business Basics for Musicians

Bobby Borg, author of Business Basics for Musicians, has complied another interview series where he talks about some of the tips you will find in his book. In this episode he talks about pursuing a career in the new music business. Watch the video below to see what he had to say!

To see more of this interview series visit the books page HERE. Let us know your thoughts on the videos in the comment section below!

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