Blog Archives

Marc Roberty Discusses Led Zeppelin with Spill Magazine

00125658Led Zeppelin – who hasn’t heard of them, one of the legendary giants of the Hard Rock genre? Many stories, myths and legends have been told of the band’s history. Probably one of the most featured bands and most written about bands ever!

Music journalist and award-nominated author Marc Roberty sat down with Mark Dean of Spill Magazine to discuss his latest book, Led Zeppelin: Day by Day , along with his writing career.

What would make this book different from other Led Zeppelin books? Roberty discussed the balance he found in creating a book that not only reached fans that had never read a Led Zeppelin book, but for the hard core fans as well. There was a lot of information released in previous books which would seem difficult to create new content, but he was able to add new information that had not been released in addition to correcting incorrect information.

The interview went on to discuss Roberty’s journey in writing this book and others.

My forte is more in the research,and finding stuff that people possibly have not known before. That is really what I enjoy doing. I have done a lot of research of music, films. I try and find old footage or old studio material that to all intents and purposes has disappeared. I try and track things down. That is probably my forte: really to try and get to the bottom of things. Follow the story through to its ending. Sometimes the search carries on. That I do find enjoyable.

Led Zeppelin: Day by Day includes details of all the concerts why band performed with known set lists in addition to reviews of significant hows throughout their career. Recording sessions for each album and session work by individual members are listed chronologically. There are also quotes from recording engineers and staff to give further insight into what it was like to be in the studio with the group.

Mark Roberty has written for the Guitarist, Rolling Stone, Financial Times, and others. In addition to his latest work about Led Zeppelin he has written several books about Eric Clapton along with co-authored the autobiography of Bobby Whitlock.


Learn more by reading the full interview here.

Advertisements

The Big Led Zeppelin Question…

Author of Led Zeppelin Day by Day, Marc Roberty, asked the big question on every Led Zeppelin fans mind…”Will Led Zeppelin ever reunite?” Visit our performing arts community, backwing.com to get the low down on whether they will ever get back together. Read a preview of the article below!


 00125658Will the founding fathers of modern rock ever give their fans the farewell tour now almost four decades overdue? A Led Zep historian considers the prospect.

The mighty Led Zeppelin existed for twelve years between 1968 and 1980. The sudden death of drummer John Bonham effectively signalled the end of the band in their eyes. How could they possibly have carried on without their powerhouse drummer and dear friend?

Of course, this did not stop fans from hoping the band would reform with a new drummer. There has been the odd get–together for charitable appearances, such as Live Aid in 1985 and Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary in 1988. Although these shows were met with mass delirium from eager fans, in reality, both inevitably fell short on the performance side. (Then again, to be fair, this is not the band’s fault: multi-act events with short three- or four-song sets are never hugely successful from a creative perspective.)

By 1994, Robert Plant had distanced himself from the whole “rock singer” tag. After being approached to perform an MTV Unplugged show, he felt uncomfortable flying the Led Zeppelin flag under his own name. A meeting took place between Robert and Jimmy Page where they talked about doing the show together. Much to his surprise, the Led Zeppelin baggage Robert had been carrying around for years had completely dissipated. The men found common ground and decided to do Unplugged together and see if anything came of it (much to the vexation of a miffed John Paul Jones, who was not invited—or even told—of the event!). They did not go out as Led Zeppelin, but rather as Page & Plant. Also, the MTV show was retitled Unledded due to the electric nature of some numbers. A live record and video from the show, which consisted of rearranged Led Zeppelin classics, were hugely successful. A new studio album and a few tours later, it was all over. When all the bad memories of Led Zeppelin playing huge arenas returned, Plant had enough. He told Page he was leaving, as he much preferred playing small clubs and reconnecting with his audience.


Read the article in its entirety HERE

47 Years Ago Today…

On August 19th 1971, Led Zeppelin played in Pacific Coliseum, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. This was Led Zeppelin’s 7th US Tour and would be best remembered for what Peter Grant did during the concert. Marc Roberty has covered everything about that tour date and more in his book, Led Zeppelin: Day by Day. Take a peek inside the book and learn what Peter Grant did in the excerpt below!


LedZepDBD_text_final.jpgLED ZEPPELIN
SEVENTH US TOUR


19 AUGUST 1971–17 SEPTEMBER 1971

19 August 1971, Pacific Coliseum, Vancouver, British
Columbia, Canada (8:30 p.m.)

Setlist not known but would probably have consisted of the following: Immigrant Song / Heartbreaker / Since I’ve Been Loving You / Out On The Tiles Intro / Black Dog / Dazed And Confused / Stairway To Heaven / Celebration Day / That’s The Way / What Is And What Should Never Be / Moby Dick / Whole Lotta Love (including Boogie Chillun’, My Baby Left Me, Mess O’ Blues, You Shook Me) / Communication Breakdown / Organ Solo / Thank You

This show is best remembered as the one where Peter Grant smashed up a Canadian official’s noise measuring equipment thinking it was a bootlegger taping the show. The New Musical Express in England reported, “Led Zeppelin cause plenty of action in the
audience as well as on stage! Zeppelin is in the middle of an American tour. Last weekend in Vancouver the band played in a hockey arena which houses over 13,000 people but it wasn’t enough and nearly 3,000 didn’t get in. Inevitably the police clashed with the punters outside. During the show a group of government scientists were checking sound levels but their equipment was mistaken for bootlegging gear. Their equipment was summarily destroyed. The local police are looking for the band’s manager for questioning.”

00125658.jpg21 August 1971, the Forum, Inglewood, Los Angeles, California
(8:30 p.m.)

Setlist: Immigrant Song / Heartbreaker / Since I’ve Been Loving You / Out On The Tiles Intro / Black Dog / Dazed And Confused / Stairway To Heaven / That’s The Way / Going
To California / What Is And What Should Never Be / Whole Lotta Love (including Boogie Chillun’, I’m Moving On, That’s Alright Mama, Dr. Kitch, Mess O’ Blues, Got A Lot O’Livin’ To Do, Honey Bee, Sugar Mama Blues, Gee, Baby Ain’t I Good To You, Kind Hearted Woman Blues) / Weekend / Rock And Roll / Communication Breakdown / Organ Solo / Thank You

Once again, the band play amazingly for the Los Angeles crowd, which is rewarded with a lengthy version of “Whole Lotta Love” with many covers in the medley. The night ends with a beautiful “Thank You,” which sums up the band’s feeling toward the audience.

22 August 1971, the Forum, Inglewood, Los Angeles, California
(8:30 p.m.)

Setlist: Walk Don’t Run / Immigrant Song / Heartbreaker / Since I’ve Been Loving You / Out On The Tiles Intro / Black Dog / Dazed And Confused / Stairway To Heaven / Celebration
Day / That’s The Way / What Is And What Should Never Be / Moby Dick / Whole Lotta Love (including Boogie Chillun’, My Baby Left Me, Mess O’ Blues, You Shook Me) / Communication Breakdown / Organ Solo / Thank You

Just when you think the previous night’s performance could not be bettered, Led Zeppelin put in another killer performance, opening up with a surprise cover of the Venture’s “Walk Don’t Run” hit single before pulverizing the crowd with “Immigrant Song.” Plant is not taking any chances with his voice, though, as he went all out at the previous show and has to warn the audience that “tonight my voice is really fucked, so I don’t think we’re gonna do much harmonizing. But we’re gonna try—so, vibe on!” It was true that at some points his voice sounded a little worn, particularly on “Stairway To Heaven,” but to be honest this was in no way going to ruin what was otherwise an impeccable and dynamic concert.

Eric Clapton, Day by Day: The Later Years 1983-2013

You could win a copy of Eric Clapton, Day by Day: The Later Years 1983-2013 by Marc Roberty at Where’s Eric!. The contest closes on November 14th, so don’t miss out! Go here for more details. Find out what Eric Clapton was singing on November 11th, 1994  in the excerpt below.

From The Cradle Club Dates 1994

11 November 1994, House of Blues, Los Angeles, California

SETLIST: Motherless Child / Malted Milk / How Long Blues / Kidman Blues / County Jail / Forty Four Blues / Blues All Day Long / Standing Around Crying / Hoochie Coochie Man /  It Hurts Me Too / Blues Before Sunrise / Third Degree / Reconsider Baby / Sinner’s Prayer / Can’t Judge Nobody / Early In The Morning / Let Me Love You Baby / Someday After A While / Tore Down / Have You Ever Loved A Woman / Crosscut Saw / Five Long Years / Crossroads / Groaning The Blues / Ain’t Nobody’s Business

And in 1999…

JAPAN TOUR 1999

11 November 1999, Gymnasium, Nagoya, Japan

SETLIST: My Father’s Eyes / Pilgrim / River of Tears / Going Down Slow / Hoochie Coochie Man / Reconsider Baby / She’s Gone / Ramblin’ On My Mind / Tears In Heaven / Bell Bottom Blues / Change The World / Gin House / Cocaine / Have You Ever Loved A Woman / Badge / Wonderful Tonight / Layla / Sunshine Of Your Love

Eric Clapton, Day by Day: The Later Years 1983-2013

Volume 2 of Eric Clapton, Day by Day covers 1983 through to 2013, listing all of Clapton’s tour dates, set lists, recording sessions, and guest appearances for that period, along with quotes and narrative from engineers, producers, and musicians who were involved. Where possible, entries for recording sessions, as well as live recordings, list all accompanying musicians and the studio locations, plus the songs that were released and those that remained in the vault.

Volume 2 details major events of the last few decades, such as the ARMS shows, which saw the three Yardbirds guitarists – Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page – onstage together for the first time since the sixties. It looks at the Cream reformation shows of 2005, with all the ups and downs associated with that reunion. In the last decade, Clapton has revisited his past on several occasions, and in 2008, he reunited with his Blind Faith band mate, Stevie Winwood. The remarkable musical chemistry between the two was obvious to fans, and the Clapton/Winwood relationship has been revived several times since. The book also covers Clapton’s well-publicized Crossroads guitar festivals, which have been well received by fans and critics. The year 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of his performing career.

Q & A with Marc Roberty

Marc Roberty is the author of Eric Clapton-Day by Day, The Early Years and the soon to be released Eric Clapton-Day by Day, The Later Years.  Here, he gives an interview on Music Tomes. Follow the link for the rest of the interview.

When did you first hear Clapton?

I first heard Clapton in 1965 when I bought the “For Your Love” single by The Yardbirds. I actually liked the poppy sound. Then I played the b-side, “Got To Hurry”, which changed my world. As a 10 year old kid I had not heard such guitar sounds before. I was intrigued and wanted more. After a lot of research I found out it was Eric Clapton’s guitar and he had just joined John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. I have followed him ever since. It also made me appreciate the guitar as an instrument which led me to Jeff Beck and Jimi Hendrix.

The two volumes of Eric Clapton, Day by Day blend biographical elements, discography, and detailed tour details, down to the setlists. How did you decide on this format, rather than writing a biography or a discography?

I wanted to put together all aspects of Eric’s musical life over the last 50 years and hopefully produce the ultimate reference book on him. I felt a simple biography or discography would only cover certain aspects of his musical career.

Take us a little behind-the-scenes with a little overview of the research you did for these in-depth books.

I have quite a large collection of old music papers, which are always a good source of information. I spent many months in various newspaper archives going back to 1963 onwards to research tour dates and venues, as well as concert adverts. On top of that I had a lot of help from Eric and his office allowing me access to tour itineraries, etc. I interviewed a multitude of musicians, producers and engineers which were very enlightening and revealing.

Go to Musictomes.com to keep reading!

Eric Clapton, Day by Day presents Clapton’s professional life in music in a day-by-day format, giving details of which bands he joined and left, all recordings made – both released and unreleased – as well as guest appearances he made on other artists’ records, and concert tours.

With Eric Clapton’s 50th anniversary in the music business approaching in 2013, now is the perfect time for this comprehensive biography.

Eric Clapton’s Career Milestone

Guest Blogger: Marc Roberty, author of Eric Clapton, Day by Day: The Early Years, 1963-1982  and the forthcoming Eric Clapton, Day by Day: The Later Years, 1983-20013.

2013 saw Eric Clapton celebrating fifty years as a professional musician. What better time to look back in every detail of his musical history? You could argue that Eric’s most creative and exciting period can be found in the first volume of Day by Day, but that would be a little short-sighted. Those first decades were very much development years with Eric searching for his voice with the Yardbirds, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, Cream, Blind Faith, Derek and the Dominos, all legendary bands that are revered to this day. But the next three decades would offer fans many surprises and some of his most successful and memorable music.

At the time of putting these two books together it seems that Eric will be retiring from lengthy tours and any live appearances after he reaches 70. As a music fan I hope that he will continue to make music, but equally I appreciate that he certainly deserves his retirement after providing so much pleasure to so many people over the last fifty years.

Whatever happens, I hope that these two volumes will provide the reader with new information and hopefully inspire them to look into some previously unexplored Eric Clapton music.

Volume 1

Eric Clapton, Day by Day presents Clapton’s professional life in music in a day-by-day format, giving details of which bands he joined and left, all recordings made – both released and unreleased – as well as guest appearances he made on other artists’ records, and concert tours.

Based on years of extensive research from around the globe and interviews with musicians, film directors, producers, and studio engineers, Roberty covers every detail of Clapton’s live and studio work in this detailed biography.

Volume 1 covers Clapton’s early years, offering an insight into how this artist slowly found his own musical identity. Volume 2, to be published in the fall of 2013, will continue the story, covering Clapton’s comeback after problematic years of drug and alcohol abuse, and his going on to become one of the world’s most respected and admired musicians.

With Eric Clapton’s 50th anniversary in the music business approaching in 2013, now is the perfect time for this comprehensive biography.

Volume 2 (Release Date: 10/29/13)

Volume 2 of Eric Clapton, Day by Day covers 1983 through to 2013, listing all of Clapton’s tour dates, set lists, recording sessions, and guest appearances for that period, along with quotes and narrative from engineers, producers, and musicians who were involved. Where possible, entries for recording sessions, as well as live recordings, list all accompanying musicians and the studio locations, plus the songs that were released and those that remained in the vault.

Volume 2 details major events of the last few decades, such as the ARMS shows, which saw the three Yardbirds guitarists – Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page – onstage together for the first time since the sixties. It looks at the Cream reformation shows of 2005, with all the ups and downs associated with that reunion. In the last decade, Clapton has revisited his past on several occasions, and in 2008, he reunited with his Blind Faith band mate, Stevie Winwood. The remarkable musical chemistry between the two was obvious to fans, and the Clapton/Winwood relationship has been revived several times since. The book also covers Clapton’s well-publicized Crossroads guitar festivals, which have been well received by fans and critics. The year 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of his performing career.

Derek and the Dominos

The following is an excerpt from Eric Clapton, Day by Day: The Early Years, 1963-1982 by Marc Roberty, published by Backbeat Books, as posted by Something Else Reviews. Please visit their site to read the whole excerpt.

Ever since the demise of Cream, Eric Clapton had been searching for his musical identity. Blind Faith may have started out with good intentions, and a lot of promise, but ultimately it was doomed to failure as soon as Ginger Baker joined the band and the business side of things took over the creative side before it had much of a chance to start. They were forced to record an album and tour before they were ready to do either. The lengthy and lucrative U.S. tour was the final nail in the coffin for the band, as they resorted to playing crowd favorites from Traffic and Cream. Delaney & Bonnie had provided a great short-term escape for Eric, and his first solo album was the first step in finding his future musical direction and path. Although that album was more of a Delaney & Bonnie album in sound, it gave him the confidence to be a solo artist. But not quite yet, as his next project was to be a cooperative band.

Bobby Whitlock had stayed with Delaney & Bonnie after the rest of the “Friends” had left with Leon Russell to join Joe Cocker’s infamous Mad Dogs And Englishmen tour in the US. After recording “Motel Shot” with them, he, too, decided it was time to leave and consider what he should do next. His friend Steve Cropper suggested he go and see Eric Clapton and spend some time in England to clear his head. As Bobby did not have much money, Steve kindly organized a plane ticket, and Bobby flew over to London Airport in April 1970. From there he took a taxi to Eric’s home in the Surrey countryside. He already knew it well, of course, as he had stayed there the previous November when Delaney & Bonnie and Friends were residing there while recording and touring with Eric.

Eric was surprised to see Bobby, but happy at the same time, as they could play music and generally hang out and have fun. Within weeks, they were starting to write songs together, but when Eric realized that Bobby would have to head off home, he asked him to stay and help him get a band together. The first step was to go and see Robert Stigwood and put him on the payroll as the first member. The band was initially being formed to promote Eric’s first solo album, which was due for release in August, but this would also be a fully functioning band that would tour and record new material. After some discussions, it was decided to get Jim Keltner on drums and Carl Radle on bass, along with Bobby Keys and Jim Price on horns. Everyone was available to come over at short notice except Jim Keltner, who was working on Gabor Szabo’s Magical Connection album for Blue Thumb, and would not be able to make it over until July. Jim Gordon, another ex-member of Delaney & Bonnie’s Friends, heard about the gig from Carl Radle and flew over with Carl and straight into a session with Eric and Bobby for PP Arnold. As he was there and ready, he was offered the job instead of Keltner…

Keep reading this excerpt on Something Else Reviews!

———————————————————————————————–

Eric Clapton, Day by Day presents Clapton’s professional life in music in a day-by-day format, giving details of which bands he joined and left, all recordings made – both released and unreleased – as well as guest appearances he made on other artists’ records, and concert tours. Volume 1 covers Clapton’s early years, offering an insight into how this artist slowly found his own musical identity. Volume 2, to be published in the fall of 2013, will continue the story, covering Clapton’s comeback after problematic years of drug and alcohol abuse, and his going on to become one of the world’s most respected and admired musicians.