Listen: Cary Ginell on Inside Art

Cary Ginell spent a half-hour with Dave Drexler on “Inside Art” on KSDS in San Diego talking about The Evolution of Mann. Cary never lets us down with his great interviews. Give it a listen!

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>>LISTEN HERE<<

More than any other musician, Herbie Mann was responsible for establishing the flute as an accepted jazz instrument. Prior to his arrival, the flute was a secondary instrument for saxophonists, but Mann found a unique voice for the flute, presenting it in different musical contexts, beginning with Afro-Cuban, and then continuing with music from Brazil, the Middle East, the Caribbean, Japan, and Eastern Europe. As Mann once said, “People would say to me, ‘I don’t know where you are right now,’ and I would respond, ‘And you’re not going to know where I’m going to be tomorrow.’” A self-described restless spirit, Herbie Mann also was a master at marketing himself. His insatiable curiosity about the world led him to experiment with different kinds of sounds, becoming a virtual Pied Piper of jazz. He attracted thousands to his concerts while alienating purists and critics alike. His career lasted for five decades, from his beginnings in a tiny Brooklyn nightclub to appearances on international stages. “I want to be as synonymous with the flute as Benny Goodman is for the clarinet,” he was fond of saying. By the time he died of prostate cancer in 2003, he had fulfilled his desire.

Q & A with Harvey Kubernik

Harvey Kubernik met up with One Heck of a Guy for a long interview about his new book, Leonard Cohen: Everybody Knows. Stay tuned for part 2 of the interview later this week!

 

Music means everything because it informs everything if you let it. ~ Harvey Kubernik

Harvey Kubernik is to music journalism what Shane Battier was to Duke basketball. Harvey is also one of the few individuals likely to read this post who will understand that analogy without an explanation: Harvey and Shane have achieved distinction in their respective fields because of their hard work, energy, enthusiasm, dedication, perseverance, and commitment. They are both hustlers.

00126365Harvey Kubernik is the kind of guy who knows 97% of the individuals associated with popular music and knows folks who know everybody in that other 3%. During his 40+ years career, he has authored six books, including This Is Rebel Music (2002), Canyon of Dreams: The Magic and the Music of Laurel Canyon (2009), and, most recently, Turn Up the Radio! Rock, Pop and Roll in Los Angeles 1956-1972. He has written liner notes for Carole King and Allen Ginsberg, appeared on documentaries about Bobby Womack and Queen, collaborated with Brian Wilson on a limited edition volume, and published multiple articles in Melody Maker, The Los Angeles Free Press, Crawdaddy!, Musician, Record Collector, Goldmine, MIX, The Los Angeles Times, MOJO, Discoveries, UNCUT, Music Life, Classic Rock, HITS, and Record Collector News. In addition, he has worked as a broadcaster, producer, and musician.

Harvey has a knack for turning up in the right place at the right time. He was, for example, in the studio during some of the sessions of the Leonard Cohen-Phil Spector collaboration that spawned Death Of A Ladies’ Man. That experience resulted in two classic Harvey Kubernik articles: What Happened When Phil Spector Met Leonard Cohen? and The Great Ones Never Leave. They Just Sit It Out Once In A While.

Most significantly for our purposes, Harvey Kubernik is the author of Leonard Cohen: Everybody Knows, which I described in my review of the book as “either the most textually substantive coffee table book ever published or the most lavishly illustrated narrative about a Canadian poet-novelist-singer-songwriter-icon on the market” and the subject of today’s Q&A.

THE HARVEY KUBERNIK Q&A

How did you come to write this book about Leonard Cohen?
A couple of years ago I was contacted by Colin Webb of Palazzo Editions, an England-based book company and packager. He has read my three interviews I conducted with Leonard from the mid and late-seventies, and was mulling over a Leonard Cohen book. He was preparing a sample text which would include all my archive quotes along with photos for a presentation at a book fair he was visiting.

Colin asked me for permission to utilize my archive, and, if things went further, would I be receptive to writing a book on Leonard? A year later his name showed up on my computer screen and we put it in motion. I did stress the aspect of a multi-voice narrative for the book and he was receptive.

How would you describe the readers you view as the primary audience for Leonard Cohen: Everybody Knows?
That’s a good question but early in the game, like a basketball match, before the opening tip off, I decided it would be a book I wanted to do for myself. Yes, it would be geared a bit to readers who already know lots of things about Leonard’s work, books, recordings and his road work, as well as the uninitiated, or new potential readers who might have just Greatest Hits package or checked him out only after hearing ‘Hallelujah” in some capacity.

Always ticking just a little in the back of my mind are the hardcore collectors and “Cohen Heads,” including website principals, previous Cohen book authors and pop music history book buffs that I knew would relish the information and data I would present.

Why even bother with the gig if I don’t deliver some new “voices” and observations as well as photos with visuals never displayed before. For a well-documented artist like Leonard Cohen I know I tossed in plenty of three-point baskets.

Even without this Cohen book scheduled. I have written and conducted interviews for decades without formal assignments or the security of publication. I like the education, the fun, the struggle, and the results. The last ten years book publishers have come to me about potential titles and suggestions for books. They are also mining Los Angeles and Hollywood for literary subjects or regional studies and not exclusively possessed or obsessed with New York subject matter or New York authors.

Secretly a lot of publishers and literary agents love and worship the lore and lure of L.A. and Hollywood, but most won’t admit it, let alone fund it. But the literary game has now changed and I’m in the league as team Kubernik.

View the rest of the interview HERE!

Women’s Comedic Monologues – Introducing Jamie Brunton

Another video in celebration of the release of Women’s Comedic Monologues That Are Actually Funny! Here is Jamie Brunton performing her monologue “Jury Duty”.

 

 

Excitingly, Jamie has also just joined the writing team for Ellen! Congratulations, Jamie.

For more funny bits from, follow her on twitter @jamierbrunton.

Scott Bomar and Music Tomes

Southbound author Scott B. Bomar answered some interview questions over at Music Tomes! Read the entire article HERE.

And for all of you Californians,  Scott will be doing a 2:00 pm book signing August 30th at the Barnes & Noble on the 3rd Street Promenade in Santa Monica. Don’t miss out!

 

How did this project come about?

Mike Edison, who is a fantastic writer, was an editor at Backbeat Books. He was the guy who 00102657worked with Will Romano on an illustrated history of prog rock that came out in 2010. Will’s book was really cool, and Mike thought it would be great to do something similar with Southern rock. He contacted a good friend of mine named Randy Poe, who wrote a great biography of Duane Allman for Backbeat called Skydog. Randy recommended me to Mike. I was not a Southern rock expert, but Randy and I had worked together on some projects, and he thought I would bring a fresh perspective to the subject. I didn’t have any preconceived ideas, so it was just sort of “jump in and go.” This is kind of funny, but the first thing I did was listen to “The South’s Gonna Do It” by the Charlie Daniels Band and I wrote down the names of all the acts he references in the lyrics. From there I began reading everything I could get my hands on, and contacting all the great surviving Southern rockers for interviews. I grew up in the South, and I had listened to a ton of this music growing up, so I really connected with it.

Southern Rock has been something that has been often hard to define. How do you define it?

In the Introduction to the book I really grapple with this issue. There are a lot of ways that people have defined Southern rock, and most of the artists who are categorized with that label have been pretty resistant to the term. Gregg Allman pointed out that saying “Southern rock” is like saying “rock rock” because rock music originated in the South. Elvis, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, and all those guys were Southerners. After the British Invasion, rock music shifted away from the South. By the time the psychedelic era ended, however, the Band, Bob Dylan, and Creedence Clearwater Revival heralded a return to the simplicity of rock’s Southern roots. That set the stage for the Allman Brothers Band, which came together in 1969. To me, Southern rock is about an era as much as it is about a sound. It was music that was created by guys (and sometimes girls, but mostly guys) from the same geographical region who shared a similar cultural background. Though you can point to specific sounds – multiple electric guitars, for instance – the music that I would categorize as Southern rock today is the music that best captures the spirit of the golden age of the genre in the 1970s.

The Future of the Music Business

In December, Hal Leonard Books will release the fourth edition of The Future of the Music Business by Steve Gordon, an invaluable guide on how to succeed in the ever-changing music industry. Here’s a look at what’s new in the fourth edition.

The Future of the Music Business

4th Edition

Similar to prior editions, the purpose of the fourth edition of the FUTURE OF THE MUSIC BUSINESS, which is scheduled to be published in December 2014, is to provide a roadmap for success in the music business – not only for musicians, songwriters and producers – but also for entrepreneurs and industry professionals. Technology has profoundly changed the recording industry and the music publishing business.  Entirely new rules, business practices and  models have emerged at breathtaking speed including in the several years since the publication of the third edition in 2008. The fourth edition explains the most recent rules,  business practices and models, and offers insights into how to take advantage of them.

Part I provides an overview of the basic rules and business practices that apply to the record and music publishing business today. We discuss how copyright law protects  songs and recordings, standard contracts including management, label and producer deals and the most recent rules and business practices that apply to the new means of distributing music, that is, downloading, streaming and webcasting, and how those rules differ in foreign countries.

Part II is intended for producers of audiovisual works such as films, documentaries, and television. This section includes information on audio-only projects such as compilations and music sampling, special projects such as musical theatre and fashion shows, and stand-alone digital projects such as web series and digital sheet music. The emphasis is on how producers seeking music for their projects can save money.

Part III offers a history of the recording industry’s struggle to come to grips with the digital era,  analyzes the current state of music piracy, explores various current  controversies, and provides some hope for the recovery of the record business.

Part IV provides a “how to” in the digital age on topics ranging from ranging from how to write hit songs in the digital era to using digital tools such as YouTube to succeed to how to use a music education to succeed as a creator or music business professional.

DVD and two free CLE credits: Attorneys will be able to obtain two free CLE credits by viewing the DVD included in the 4th edition. The DVD contains a conversation between myself and Bob Clarida, a leading copyright litigation lawyer and adjunct professor at Columbia Law School, about Robin Thicke’s copyright infringement case involving his monster hit “Blurred Lines” and Gaye’s song “Got to Give It Up.”
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Watch: Leonard Cohen – Everybody Knows

Watch the new book trailer for Leonard Cohen: Everybody Knows coming from Backbeat Books this September!

 

 

Leonard Cohen’s songs and poetry are defined by their emotional and intellectual intelligence. Lyrically potent, his records are full of romance, innuendo, and humor, and in performance his smoke-black vocal cords navigate the most sophisticated and arresting of melodies.

Illustrated with 200 rare black-and-white and color photographs and items of memorabilia and featuring the recollections and comments of those who have worked with him and are close to him, Leonard Cohen: Everybody Knows is a celebration of the life, music, and poetry of a unique artist and music legend.

Win a Zemaitis Custom Shop Metal Front Guitar

Contest Slide 770x420       Guitar Player and Rolling Stones Gear have teamed up to give you a chance to Win the Brands of the Rolling Stones! Now you can own some of the major brands of equipment the Rolling Stones played including Fender, Martin, Framus, Zemaitis, Gretsch, and Vox in this exciting new sweepstakes! They are also giving away the new book Rolling Stones Gear: All the Stones’ Instruments from Stage to Studio by Andy Babiuk and Greg Prevost. Check out this beautiful Zemaitis custom shop metal front guitar – you can win this! Andy and Greg of Rolling Stones Gear speak about the Stones’ love for Zemaitis in their book.

ENTER TONY ZEMAITIS

During his early days with the Faces, Ronnie played a Gibson SG, followed by a red Fender Stratocaster, and then a Danelectro, all of which were subsequently stolen. In the end, he resorted to personalized guitars made by the legendary British luthier Tony Zemaitis. “No one would dare steal his guitars because he makes them so individual,” Ronnie explained. “He plasters your name all over it.” Antanas Kazimeras Zemaitis (1935-2002), born in London England became an apprentice cabinetmaker when he was sixteen and went on to make high-quality furniture. After taking up guitar in the 1950s, he began building his own instruments. By the early 1960s, he had become an accomplished twelve-sting guitarist who shared stages with the likes of Long John Baldry and acoustic guitar wizard Davy Graham. Twelve-string guitars were a rare commodity in England, and Zemaitis made a name for himself building twelve-strings for Spencer Davis, Ralph McTell, and others.

Ron Wood was introduced to Zemaitis’s guitars in 1970 through Faces’ roadie Peter Buckland and commissioned Zemaitis to build two guitars for him. Zemaitis was known for his unique-looking electric guitars built with a metal plate on the top face of the guitar, which was intended to shield the guitar and reduce the hum produced by the pickups. The first Zemaitis Metal Front electric guitar was built for Tony McPhee of the Groundhogs; the second was built for Ronnie Wood. It had a single-cutaway mahogany body similar to a Les Paul and a mahogany neck with a bound ebony fingerboard. The 25-inch scale guitar was fitted with two humbucking pickups and a three-way toggle switch with two volume and two tone metal control knobs. To insure that each of his electrics was unique, Zemaitis teamed with his friend Danny O’Brien, a master gun engraver. Zemaitis handcrafted his own metal bridges, tailpieces, truss rod covers, pickup mounting rings, jack plates, rear electronics plates, and metal front facerplates, while O’Brien skillfully hand engraved each part, personalizing the guitar for the client. Ronnie Wood’s first Zemaitis Metal Front guitar also had two metal control knobs on the lower bout of the guitar.

The second electric guitar Zemaitis built to Wood’s specifications was an all-black, single-cutaway “Disc Front” model, named for a round metal plate on the face of the guitar that O’Brien engraved with a treasure map. The 25-inch scale guitar had a mahogany body and neck and an unbound ebony fingerboard with dot inlays that started at the first fret and became smaller as they went up. The guitar was fitted with three humbucking pickups and a combination of six volume and tone control knobs, a five-way selector switch, and a built-in preamp powered by a nine-volt battery. The handcrafted Zemaitis metal bridge, tailpiece, truss rod cover, jack plate, and rear electronics plate also were hand engraved by O’Brien.

Wood’s 1971 appearance with the Faces on Top of The Pops playing his Metal Front guitar sparked a huge interest in Zemaitis’s eye-catching work. It also inspired Zemaitis’s next creation, a Pearl Front guitar that he considered perfect for the stage because it would catch the light and change color. The guitar was similar to the Metal Front guitar, but, instead of the engraved metal plate, the top face of the guitar was inlaid with a mosaic of pearl and abalone. Wood received one of the first Zemaitis Pearl Front guitars, which was fitted with three single-coil pickups instead of humbuckers. In the latter stages of the Faces and during his early involvement with the Stones, Wood also owned a hardtail 1955 sunburst Fender Stratocaster, and a Dan Armstrong Plexi guitar which he made the mistake of giving to David Bowie. “I thought I could get another one,” Wood said with regret, “and I couldn’t.” His amplification at the time was strictly Ampeg SVTs, which were painted white while he was in the Faces.