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A GRAMMY Salute to Music Legends Book Promo

Now for the first time, The Recording Academy and Hal Leonard Books have collected two decades of Special Merit Award honoree tributes in A GRAMMY Salute To Music Legends. A GRAMMY Salute To Music Legends edited by David Konjoyan, offers a glimpse into how artists are personally affected by other artists, and the debt of gratitude, influence and inspiration they owe each other.  Take a look at the book trailer below.



00151136fcThe 87 honorees featured in A GRAMMY Salute To Music Legends have made extraordinary contributions to blues, classical, country, R&B, rock, rap and other forms of music either as performers or behind the scenes as producers, engineers, songwriters, executives or technical innovators. The collected tributes are sometimes touching, sometimes humorous and always inspiring.

Editor David Konjoyan writes in his introduction: “As with other innovations, whether science-, technology-, or business-related, none happen in a vacuum and all have deep reverberations. That’s what this book is all about: the sources of those reverberations and the revelations of those who were impacted by them and filtered them into their own groundbreaking work.” 

In some cases, the relationship between the writer and legend is obvious (Quincy Jones honoring Michael Jackson or Miranda Lambert writing about Dolly Parton); in others the influence is perhaps surprising (Queen’s Brian May paying tribute to Doris Day or Steven Van Zandt writing about Dean Martin). Sometimes the reverberations transcend music entirely, as when Sen. Patrick Leahy writes about his friendship with the Grateful Dead. Additional honorees highlighted in the collection include The Beatles; David Bowie; Earth, Wind & Fire; Leonard Cohen; Carole King; Barbra Streisand; and Run DMC.


DAVID KONJOYAN is the Vice President of Creative Services at The Recording Academy. In 2007 he edited And the GRAMMY Goes To…, a coffee-table book celebrating 50 years of the GRAMMY Awards. He has worked as a music journalist and in radio promotion and public relations and has developed and executive-produced two albums: 1994’s tribute to Karen and Richard Carpenter, If I Were a Carpenter, and the offbeat nod to the neo-lounge movement, Lounge-A-Palooza, in 1997. He lives in Los Angeles.

 

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Neil Young’s Springsteen Tribute

Glen_Boyd_Neil Young_FAQ_Author photoGuest Blogger: Glen Boyd is the author of Neil Young FAQ. Visit his blog for more Neil Young updates and discussions!

On the eve of the 2013 Grammy Awards, a whos-who of music royalty — spanning genres from rock to pop to country and beyond (Latin pop superstar Juanes was perhaps the least likely surprise, performing “Hungry Heart”) — paid tribute to Bruce Springsteen as MusiCares Person Of The Year.

Now, for those of you asking what all of this has to do with our usual focus on all things Neil Young…well, it just so happens that Neil (a past MusiCares honoree himself) was among the participants.

Not surprisingly — even with a star-studded lineup boasting names as diverse as Elton John, Sting, Mumford & Sons, Patti Smith, Kenny Chesney, Tim McGraw and the aforementioned Juanes — the burning question this week amongst Rusties was both simple and obvious:

What Bruce song would Neil play?

Earlier this week, an online poll posted by our good friends over at Thrashers Wheat favored “The River” (by 25%) — with choices like “Streets Of Philadelphia” (covered by Elton John at the event); “Atlantic City” (performed by Dixie Chick Natalie Maines and Ben Harper) and “The Ghost Of Tom Joad” (Jim James and Tom Morello) running not far behind.

But the one Bruce song most everyone seemed to agree was the least likely that Neil Young would perform was “Born In The USA”.

So which song do you think Neil — with Crazy Horse, no less — actually played?

Read Glen Boyd’s blog post to find out! [includes photo of set list]

Neil Young FAQ is the first definitive guide to the music of this mercurial and methodical, enduring, and infuriating icon. From the Archives to Zuma and from the Ditch Trilogy to the Geffen years, this book covers every song and album in painstaking detail-including bootlegs and such lost recordings as HomegrownChrome DreamsToast, and Meadow Dusk.