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Thornton Cline & Jim Riley, an interview

Onstage and Backstage podcast from Hal Leonard is available on iTunes and Libsyn. Each episode authors and their guests have a chat about the topics of their books. Today, Thornton Cline (Practice Personalities: What’s Your Type?) is joined by Rascal Flatts drummer Jim Riley (Song Charting Made Easy) to discuss music education and matching personalities types to practice methods for musicians.

>>LISTEN HERE<<

Jim Riley

Jim Riley

Thornton Cline

Thornton Cline

Teaching is one of the greatest responsibilities in society. It’s an art form that requires craft, patience, creativity, and intelligence. Practice Personalities: What’s Your Type? will help teachers, parents and students realize the challenges of practicing, understand the benefits of correct practicing, identify and understand nine practice personality types, and employ useful strategies to effectively motivate and inspire each type of student. The accompanying CD demonstrates effective practice strategies for selected piano, violin and guitar excerpts from the book.

Drum Conditioning

The following is an excerpt of Instrument & Vocal Recording: The Hal Leonard Recording Method (Book 2), 2nd Edition by Bill Gibson. For more on this subject, follow Bill’s Drum Genie blog and check out his free Drum Genie app for the iPhone and iPad.
To get good drum sounds, it’s necessary to be familiar with drum tuning and dampening techniques. A bad-sounding drum is nearly impossible to get a good recorded sound from. A good-sounding drum can make your recording experience much more enjoyable.
     If the drum heads are dented and stretched out, cancel the rest of your appointments for the day. You’ll be spending a substantial amount of time getting an acceptable drum sound.
     If the drums aren’t high-quality instruments, there’s a good chance that the shells aren’t smooth and level, and there’s a possibility that the drums aren’t even perfectly round. If this is the case, the heads won’t seat evenly on the drum shell and there’ll be a loss of tone, detracting from the drum sound.

Tuning

Often, the primary difference between a good-sounding drum and a bad-sounding drum lies simply in tuning. The standard approach to tuning involves:
• Tuning the top head to the tone you want
• Making sure the pitch is the same all the way around the head by tapping at each lug and adjusting the lugs until they all match
• Duplicating the sound of the top head with the bottom head

Hal Leonard Recording Method – Book 2: Instrument & Vocal Recording – 2nd Edition by Bill Gibson

This edition addresses new equipment and software concerns that affect the way excellent recordings are made. Updated text, illustrations, photos, and video examples add to the power of the previous edition, plus new techniques and considerations are presented as they pertain to additional recording scenarios. You’ll learn what you need to know about capturing the best vocal and instrument tracks possible, no matter what kind of studio you are working in or what kind of equipment is used.

Bill Gibson has spent the last thirty-plus years writing, performing, recording, producing, and teaching music. He has written more than thirty books and produced several videos covering important audio concepts. His style is acclaimed for straightforward and understandable explanations of audio concepts and applications. Gibson, an instructor at the Art Institute of Seattle, is also known for his work helping Quincy Jones author the book Q on Producing. He has developed curriculum and currently teaches online sound courses for Berklee College of Music in Boston. The courses have been very helpful to an amazingly diverse international student body. Gibson lives in Seattle, Washington, and serves as a trustee for the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences and also on the National Advisory Board for the Recording Academy’s Producers and Engineers Wing. Visit his website and follow him on Twitter.