In Memory of Lorin Maazel

Last Sunday, legendary conductor Lorin Maazel sadly passed away at the age of 84. He began conducting at the early age of nine, traveled the world to lead countless orchestras, and served as the leader of the New York Philharmonic from 2002-2009. This amazingly talented artist and scholar is featured prominently in John Canarina’s 2010 book entitled The New York Philharmonic: From Bernstein to Maazel. The excerpt below describes Maazel’s first steps into orchestral fame and his rocky introduction to the New York Philharmonic. Critic Greg Sandow once described Maazel’s work as “impulsive” and “unpredictable”, however he also suggested that, as to Maazel’s impact on the Philharmonic, “We just might be surprised.” Maazel’s talent and passion (for the New York Philharmonic in particular) make him widely regarded as one of the world’s most prominent conductors. Thank you, Mr. Maazel:

 

When Lorin Maazel began his tenure as music director of the New York Philharmonic, he was seventy-two years old. But he made his first podium appearance when he conducted the orchestra Layout 1of the Interlochen Music Camp at the New York World’s Fair in 1939 – when he was nine. At the more advanced age of eleven he conducted a nationwide radio broadcast with the NBC Orchestra, and conducted a nationwide radio broadcast with the NBC Orchestra, and in 1942, at the age of twelve, he made his debut with the New York Philharmonic at Lewisohn Stadium. After appearances with other major American orchestras, he enrolled at the University of Pittsburgh at sixteen, received a Fullbright Fellowship in 1951 to study baroque music in Italy, and made his adult conducting debut in Catania, Sicily in 1953. Engagements with European orchestras followed, and in 1960 he became the first American and the youngest conductor to appear at Germany’s prestigious Bayreuth Festival. (The word “appear” is perhaps misleading, for the orchestra and conductor are hidden from view.)

His contract was for four years, and there were some in the profession who regarded it as something of a stopgap for the Philharmonic. Already there was talk of a search for Maazel’s successor. Maazel, however, spoke of his appointment as possibly “the fruition of my experience as a conductor, to work with an orchestra I really love…I’m more enthusiastic about my future with this orchestra than I have ever been about anything I have ever done anyplace.”

 

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About HLPAPG

Hal Leonard Performing Arts Publishing Group, the trade book division of Hal Leonard Corporations, publishes books on the performing arts under the imprints Hal Leonard Books, Backbeat Books, Amadeus Press, and Applause Theatre and Cinema Books.

Posted on July 16, 2014, in Classical & Opera and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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