Happy Birthday, Larry!

Today is Larry Fine’s birthday. Below are a few facts about Larry and an excerpt from Three Stooges FAQ, by David J. Hogan. Enjoy!

 3 Facts You May Not Know about Louis Feinberg (aka Larry Fine)

1. Larry was “a habitué of racetracks who loved fine clothes as much as he loved the ponies.”

2. Larry could play the violin and dance. He also worked as a song plugger, selling sheet music to vaudeville performers and others.

3. Larry wrote an autobiography, titled Stroke of Luck.

And now, an excerpt about The Three Stooges short Goof on the Roof (1953), in which the Stooges’ encounter some problems while attempting to install a television:

“Larry is all about dogged determination after stepping on a control knob and bending the extender that connects the knob to the set’s tuner. He attempts to hammer the tube straight by holding it against a wall but only manages to create a shocking hole – and drop the knob inside the wall in the bargain. But he’s determined to retrieve this vital piece, so after a while the wall has been hammered so vigorously that it appears to have been ravaged by a crackbrained picturehanger.

Larry can’t spot the knob, so he foolishly peers into one of the holes with a lighted match. Moe scolds him for inviting a fire and then carelessly tosses Larry’s match through the hole.

The subsequent smoldering fire invites some good physical gags with a tiny fire extinguisher and a knotted garden hose that’s attached to the kitchen faucet. The bit climaxes when Moe furiously sticks the gushing hose down the front of Shemp’s pants.

Shemp, like Larry, is in never-say-die mode and makes his way with the antenna to the roof of the house, where he batters the chimney into pieces (which conk Larry after he sticks his head from a window to see what the heck is going on), and later pounds a hole into the roof with such vigor that he plummets through the ceiling below. “I faw down!” he says apologetically.

Three Stooges FAQ

This entertaining and informative study of the Three Stooges focuses on the nearly 190 two-reel short comedies the boys made at Columbia Pictures during the years 1934-59. Violent slapstick? Of course, but these comic gems are also peerlessly crafted and enthusiastically played by vaudeville veterans Moe, Larry, Curly, Shemp, and Joe – arguably the most popular and long-lived screen comics ever produced by Hollywood.

Detailed production and critical coverage is provided for every short, plus information about each film’s place in the Stooges’ careers, in Hollywood genre filmmaking, and in the larger fabric of American culture. From Depression-era concerns to class warfare to World War II to the cold war to rock-and-roll – the Stooges reflected them all.

Seventy-five stills, posters, and other images – many never before published in book form – bring colorful screen moments to life and help illuminate the special appeal of key shorts. Exclusive sections include a Stooges biographical and career timeline; a useful, colorful history of the structure and behind-the-camera personnel of the Columbia two-reel unit; and personality sidebars about more than 30 popular players who worked frequently with the Stooges. Also included is a filmography that covers all 190 shorts, plus a bibliography, making this the ultimate guide for all Three Stooges fans!

Advertisements

About HLPAPG

Hal Leonard Performing Arts Publishing Group, the trade book division of Hal Leonard Corporations, publishes books on the performing arts under the imprints Hal Leonard Books, Backbeat Books, Amadeus Press, and Applause Theatre and Cinema Books.

Posted on October 5, 2013, in Film & TV and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: