More Tips for Studio One Users

William Edstrom Jr. is the author of Studio One for Engineers and Producers.  Here are some video tutorial excerpts from the DVD.  For more tips on Studio One, check out this post about Larry the O’s series, Power Tools for Studio One 2.  

RECORDING TO LAYERS

Setting Tempo of Imported Audio Tutorial

Comping Example

Audio Bend Examples

Find more great tutorials for DAWS software and other music-related skills on our MusicPro Guides YouTube channel!

Studio One for Engineers and Producers

Studio One for Engineers and Producers is specifically designed to help engineers and producers who are already comfortable using another DAW software platform make the transition to Studio One. Text, illustrations, and video examples (on the accompanying DVD-ROM) demonstrate the creative, practical, and technical benefits provided by PreSonus in this modern, well-developed, flexible, and user-friendly application. All instruction is presented in straightforward and simple language that gets right to the point, taking into consideration the need for amateurs, home studio owners, and commercial professionals to get up to speed very quickly.

This Quick Pro Guide starts by relating Studio One’s layout and functionality to other common DAWs, to identify the most important similarities and differences. It then follows the creative process through the normal progression of a modern recording/production, to help the reader get to work as soon as possible. This new cross-platform (Mac/PC) DAW is built from the ground up for speed, efficiency, and power; Studio One for Engineers and Producers is the perfect tool to shorten the pathway from installation to inspiration!

Tips for Pro Tools Users

Glenn Lorbecki is the author of Power Tools for Pro Tools 10, and 2 books in Hal Leonard’s Quick Pro Guide series, Tracking Instruments and Vocals with Pro Tools and Mixing and Mastering with Pro Tools. Below are excerpts from the DVD that comes with Tracking Instruments and Vocals with Pro Tools.

USING PLAYLISTS

Rough Mix Tutorial

Window Configuration

Headphone Mix Tutorial

Importing Audio

Basic EQ Tutorial

Edit Window Controls

Find more great tutorials for DAWS software and other music-related skills on our MusicPro Guides YouTube channel!

Tracking Vocals and Instruments with Pro Tools is an indispensable guide to getting the most out of your music and your PT rig. Multiplatinum engineer/producer Glenn Lorbecki shows you step by step how to record vocals and a wide array of musical instruments.

Studio One

Guest Blogger: William Edstrom, Jr. is the author of Studio One for Engineers and Producers. For his full article, visit presonus.com.

I’ve done projects in just about every DAW on the market. To use most of these systems you need to be in a very technical frame of mind. About three years ago, I was looking for something simpler—something to get creative songwriting ideas out. That’s when I discovered Studio One. The workflow made sense to me and it helped me write.

As I got more interested in Studio One, I discovered anther great thing—a community of users that were amazingly helpful and enthusiastic. I started contributing to the PreSonus Forum with some free YouTube videos which lead to my work with Groove 3. I went on to create four volumes (24 hours worth!) of video training for Studio One.

When I started talking to Bill Gibson at Hal Leonard about some book concepts, I really wanted to do a Studio One book. I think they see the potential for this DAW because they have already published Larry the O’s book Power Tools for Studio One with a second volume on the way…

Keep reading this article on presonus.com!

Studio One for Engineers and Producers

Studio One for Engineers and Producers is specifically designed to help engineers and producers who are already comfortable using another DAW software platform make the transition to Studio One. Text, illustrations, and video examples (on the accompanying DVD-ROM) demonstrate the creative, practical, and technical benefits provided by PreSonus in this modern, well-developed, flexible, and user-friendly application. All instruction is presented in straightforward and simple language that gets right to the point, taking into consideration the need for amateurs, home studio owners, and commercial professionals to get up to speed very quickly.

This Quick Pro Guide starts by relating Studio One’s layout and functionality to other common DAWs, to identify the most important similarities and differences. It then follows the creative process through the normal progression of a modern recording/production, to help the reader get to work as soon as possible. This new cross-platform (Mac/PC) DAW is built from the ground up for speed, efficiency, and power; Studio One for Engineers and Producers is the perfect tool to shorten the pathway from installation to inspiration!

Tips for Reason Users

Andrew Eisele is the author of Power Tools for Reason 6 and two books in Hal Leonard’s Quick Pro Guide series, The Power in Reason and Sound Design and Mixing in Reason. Below are some excerpts from DVDs that come with his books, great tools for users of the DAWS program, Reason. Visit our MusicPro Guides YouTube channel for more useful videos like these.

BASIC RECORDING AND EDITING

More tips from Andrew Eisele
Reason Overview

Synthesizers

Drums

Sequencing Drums

Samplers

Mixing Tips

Visit our Power in Reason playlist and our Pro Tools for Reason 6 playlist for tips on effects, mastering, automation, creating motion, quantizing MIDI, adding warm distortion, and more!

Power Tips for Logic Pro Users

Dot Bustelo is the author of the Hal Leonard’s Quick Guide books, The Power in Logic Pro and Logic Pro for Recording Engineers and Producers. Below, you’ll find excerpts from the DVDs that come with the books, useful information for Logic Pro users.

KEY COMMANDS

More free Power Tips on Logic Pro from Dot Bustelo:

Modifying Key Commands

Beat Mapping

Channel Strip Settings

Zooming

Grouping

Find more videos like this on our MusicPro Guides YouTube Channel.

The Power in Logic Pro and Logic Pro for Recording Engineers and Producers are books in Hal Leonard’s QUICK PRO GUIDES series, tutorials for various DAWS products written by experts.

 

What Is Hal Leonard up to at AES This Year?

The Audio Engineering Society conference takes place in San Francisco this year from Oct. 26 to Oct. 29. Stop by the Hal Leonard booth. Buy books, talk to authors, enter our giveaway, and more!

.

In the Booth

Hal Leonard’s new, innovative Quick Pro Guides series and newly revamped Power Tools line include tutorials on Ableton, Logic Pro, Pro Tools, Reason, Cubase, and Studio One. Hal Leonard’s authors include Bobby Owsinski, Mixerman, Moses Avalon, Bill Gibson, Howard Massey, Alan Parsons, Dave Hampton, Chilitos Valenzuela, Steve Turnidge, and many others.
.

Giveaway

Drop your business card in the jar at the Hal Leonard booth for your chance to win a copy of Alan Parsons’ The Art and Science of Sound Recording DVD set. The winner will be contacted by email the week following AES.
.

MusicPro Guides YouTube Channel

MusicPro Guides is giving away prizes on our YouTube channel. To enter the drawing, subscribe to youtube.com/musicproguides between October 26 and November 10th. If you are already a subscriber, enter the drawing by commenting on the front page video. We’ll announce the winner on November 27th on our YouTube channel. Prizes include the complete Mixerman book collection; a prize pack of books that include Quick Pro Guides, Desktop Mastering, and Electronic Musician Presents the Recording Secrets Behind 50 Great Albums; and a Skype call with Bruce Swedien.
.

Panels, Tutorials, and Workshops with Hal Leonard authors

Presenter: Bobby Owsinski
Session T3
Friday, Oct. 26, 4-6pm
Bobby Owsinski, author of Music 3.0, will give a presentation on social media. Facebook,  Google+, Twitter and YouTube are important elements for developing a fan base or client list, but without the proper strategy they can prove ineffective and take so much time that there’s none left for creating. This presentation shows engineers, producers, audio professionals, and musicians the best techniques and strategy to utilize social media as a promotional tool without it taking 20 hours a day.
 
2. Total Tracking: Get It Right at Source: Choosing and Recording Your Sound Source
Presenter: Bill Gibson
Saturday, Oct. 27 at noon in PSE2 and Sunday, Oct. 28, noon-1pm  in PSE8
The astonishing and ever-improving power and versatility of digital signal processing plug-ins for computer audio workstations has encouraged the widespread belief that everything can be “fixed in the mix”—and in many cases, of course, it can. However, this approach is always extremely time-consuming and the results aren’t always perfect. It is often much faster, and with far more satisfying results, to get the right sound from the outset by careful selection of the source and appropriate microphone selection and positioning. This workshop will explore a wide variety of examples, analysing the requirements and discussing practical techniques of optimising source recordings.
 
Chair: Bill Gibson
Panelists: Dave Hampton, Mixerman, Steve Turnidge, Dot Bustelo
W10
Sunday, Oct. 28, 4pm-6pm
Music Business Panel: Show Me the Money! Finding Success in an Evolving Audio Industry includes a panel discussion about the new music business. The mission of this workshop is to provide insightful tactics and techniques for the modern audio professional—ways to make money in the current business reality. Topics include proven ways to increase profitability, nuts and bolts explanations of setting up your business to receive payments for licensing, sync fees, Internet and other new media delivery systems, and more. Panel consists of noted authors and music business experts, Dot Bustelo (author of The Power in Logic Pro), Dave Hampton (author of The Business of Audio Engineering), Mixerman (author of Zen and the Art of Producing and The Daily Adventures of Mixerman), and Steve Turnidge (author of Desktop Mastering). Bill Gibson (author of The Hal Leonard Recording Method and Q on Producing) will moderate. 
.
Hope to see you there!
.
Here we were at AES last year:

Mixing and Mastering

Hal Leonard has started a new video series of author video chats with MusicPro Guides and Quick Pro Guides authors, which you can view at MusicPro Guide’s YouTube channel. Today we continue the series with Glenn Lorbecki author of Mixing and Mastering with Pro Tools. Interviewed by Hal Leonard author and editor Bill Gibson.

Mixing and Mastering with Pro Tools

Avid’s relatively recent move to open the Pro Tools software platform to third-party interfaces has given the user numerous new options, making Pro Tools’ renowned recording platform available for Mac and PC systems – not just Avid hardware. Given Pro Tools’ high-tech enhancements in connectivity, functionality, and session portability, users need a practical guide to get up and running quickly and efficiently. This Quick Pro Guide cuts to the chase and gives you the best of Pro Tools at your fingertips, with plenty of sessions, audio examples, and video assistance to guide you along the way.

Interview with author Jake Perrine

Hal Leonard has started a new video series of author video chats with MusicPro Guides and Quick Pro Guides authors, which you can view at MusicPro Guide’s YouTube channel. Today, we launch the first two with Jake Perrine, the author of Quick Pro Guides books Producing Music with Ableton Live and Sound Design, Mixing, and Mastering with Ableton Live. Here, he is interviewed by Bill Gibson, Hal Leonard editor and author.

Producing Music with Ableton Live

Learn to make electronic dance music with the innovative application that started – and is still leading – the revolution! Start producing your own music from the ground up! Ableton Live is a groundbreaking program whose unique nonlinear, incredibly flexible features set it far apart from all the other digital audio applications. It is equally at home with making beats, remixing, live recording, DJing, live looping, sound design, electronic music, hip-hop, and much more.

Sound Design, Mixing, and Mastering with Ableton Live

Go beyond the basics of Ableton Live with this book of audio making and mangling recipes, tips, and mixing/mastering techniques. Ableton Live is undoubtedly the most flexible audio application available today: Use it for sound design for music, film, theater, and games; composition; improvising with other musicians; live looping; DJing; and of course mixing and mastering music. Author, mastering engineer, certified Ableton trainer, and power-user Jake Perrine will inspire you to use Live in new ways, and to improve how you already use it. Striking a delicate balance of artistry and theory, he will expand your repertoire for both the studio and the stage.

The Emergence of the Laptop Producer

Guest Blogger: Jake Perrinne is the author of both Sound Design, Mixing, and Mastering with Ableton Live and Producing Music with Ableton Live.

During my years as an instructor of Audio Production at the Art Institute of Seattle from 1999 to 2010, I noted the steady emergence of what I like to refer to as the “laptop producer”. This is someone who would like to produce music – professional, world-changing, dance floor frenzy-inducing music – using little more than a laptop and pair of headphones. Most of the time, they tend to be making either electronic dance music or hip-hop, and they often come from limited financial means. The exponentially increasing attendance at electronic music festivals and the recent Grammy nod to “underground” dubstep laptop producer Skrillex are symptoms of what I am talking about.

Where so many youth used to pick up an electric guitar in hopes of one day becoming the next Beatles, Led Zeppelin or Nirvana, for many, the laptop is steadily taking its place. Instead of fetishizing classic amps, pickups and pedals, the laptop producer scours the internet for new freeware VST plugins. Long hours of learning chords and scales are replaced with operating system and audio application upgrades, and watching YouTube videos to learn the latest editing and sound design techniques.

The laptop producer does not want a career as an audio engineer behind a mixing board in a studio. Recording multi-track performances of a band’s live performance of their compositions is rarely their aim: instead, the laptop serves as an editing tool for cutting-up and rearranging previously recorded sounds into something entirely new. They want to create their music in their bedroom, or on the bus on the way to their day-job, and when the weekend comes, go perform it as a DJ at a house party, club or festival.  While this is entirely possible with the advent of multi-function DAW (digital audio workstation) environments such as the now ubiquitous Ableton Live (www.ableton.com), you still need to know some things about sound and computers in order to excel at this craft.

This knowledge gap is what a growing percentage of musicians are looking to fill, and it is what inspired me to write my first two books for Hal Leonard: Producing Music with Ableton Live and Sound Design, Mixing and Mastering with Ableton Live. These books seek to simultaneously train a new user to use Live to make music, and give them the audio and computer fundamentals they additionally need in order to understand what they are doing. The tutorial-based format provides a linear “path through the woods” to learn the program while also learning workflows for building a song from start to finish. It is aimed squarely at the laptop producer who does not have a degree in audio, computers or music theory, but wants to learn a specific subset of skills cherry-picked from each of those topics that uniquely pertain to their music making goals.

Sound Design, Mixing, and Mastering with Ableton Live

Go beyond the basics of Ableton Live with this book of audio making and mangling recipes, tips, and mixing/mastering techniques. Ableton Live is undoubtedly the most flexible audio application available today: Use it for sound design for music, film, theater, and games; composition; improvising with other musicians; live looping; DJing; and of course mixing and mastering music. Author, mastering engineer, certified Ableton trainer, and power-user Jake Perrine will inspire you to use Live in new ways, and to improve how you already use it. Striking a delicate balance of artistry and theory, he will expand your repertoire for both the studio and the stage.

Producing Music with Ableton Live

Learn to make electronic dance music with the innovative application that started – and is still leading – the revolution! Start producing your own music from the ground up! Ableton Live is a groundbreaking program whose unique nonlinear, incredibly flexible features set it far apart from all the other digital audio applications. It is equally at home with making beats, remixing, live recording, DJing, live looping, sound design, electronic music, hip-hop, and much more.

Becoming One With Logic

.
Guest Blogger:
Dot Bustelo, author of The Power in Logic Pro (April 2012, Hal Leonard Books)

.

When Hal Leonard asked me to write a book on Logic, I thought about two issues that users have brought to me over and over: “So, how do I learn Logic,” and, “Dot, I feel like I’m only using 10 percent of the program. I know there’s so much more I can do with Logic!” After agreeing to write the book, I set about channeling the method of introducing Logic that I developed during my years on Apple’s worldwide Logic team and previously at Emagic. I had the privilege of demonstrating to world-class musicians, hit producers, and engineers from all over the world at countless recording studios, tradeshows, and music stores, all the while on my own humble path to produce music and become “One with Logic.”

The truth is, at one point I had to take the time to learn Logic too, so I really do get it when people feel overwhelmed. Digital technology is making music production accessible so everyone, including myself, can have a “professional” studio. But for most people it remains a tease.  There’s no assurance of really knowing what to do with it. I’m quite proud of the music I produce and license as Perfect Project, and I have become a master of the software, but I’m not going to lie, it’s been a time-intensive endeavor. There’s that major hump at the beginning and then you have to make the effort to continue actively learning. Over time, the learning process becomes much easier and very satisfying—knowledge of a new feature can be as thrilling as a new piece of gear.

The best advice I have for becoming “one” with Logic is to treat it like an instrument. The commitment required to get good is no different than the commitment you make to get good at playing the piano or the guitar. You have to learn the language of the instrument, and you have to practice. Give yourself focused time to learn your new instrument—time that is in addition to the time you plan to write in Logic. Take the pressure off yourself. You don’t have to create a masterpiece each time you launch the app. You don’t even have to feel inspired when you boot it up. You just need to practice and learns something new.

Just start shopping for sounds in the vast collection of instruments, plug-in settings, channel strip settings, and Apple Loops. Begin saving your own custom channel strip settings with the Logic or third party instruments, and Logic will start to become your own personal instrument. Build your own mega EXS24 sample library and learn how to save your drum samples right inside your Logic project. I guarantee this will be the most stable and CPU-efficient sampler you ever use. And you’ll develop your own unique sound inside Logic. Back up your Logic Application Support home folder, select all of the inner checkboxes in your Logic project folders, then you can carry your Logic sounds everywhere and load them into any Logic studio.

What do I mean to learn the language of Logic? When I was learning Logic, I got the advice from more senior Emagic colleagues to print out the Key Commands and hang them in my bathroom. I didn’t exactly do that, but I did carry them around with me. I printed them out using a trick in the Key Commands window under Options, “Copy Key Commands to Clipboard,” then dropped them into Microsoft Word. Bam! They were ready to print.  Warning: Be sure to limit the view to Used Key Commands in the Show menu, or else you’ll be printing fifty pages.

No, I never learned every key command, but I do have a “hot list” of my favorite thirty key commands that I share in the book. Study these, cross-reference any unfamiliar terminology in the Help files, and then make your own set of power key commands that support your unique workflow. This will set you on the path to becoming one with Logic.

When you set out to learn the language of Logic, you’ll discover quirky Logic-centric vocabulary terms, such as the Transform window and the Hyper Editor. Other Logic terms such as the Marquee Tool and the Inspector are universally shared with other applications within and outside the Apple universe. By the way, if you’re not using the Marquee Tool for editing in Logic, you are wasting A LOT of time.

Here are a few essential Logic terms. When these are your best friends, you will be on your way to realizing Logic’s potential.

  • Channel Strip Settings: Explore the ones from the factory and create A LOT of your own.
  • The Marquee Tool: There’s at least a dozen critical editing and navigation techniques using this tool.
  • The Transform Editor: Absolutely brilliant MIDI editing. The best “retro Logic” tricks ever.
  • Groove Templates: Young Guru swears by these. Enough said.
  • Control-Option Zooming: The backbone of old school Logic navigation.
  • Command-Click Tool Assignment: Essential.  My personal choice is the Marquee Tool.

The more you tune in to the vocabulary, the easier it is to address a problem within the Help files or while Googling online a solution. I’m honored to feature two prominent Logic users in the book: Jay Z’s engineer, Young Guru, and Mat Mitchell, whose credits include Tool, NIN, and Katy Perry. They share their favorite techniques for making music groove better in Logic. Both, coincidentally, say they learned Logic by reading the manual.

Just remember Logic is your instrument. Allow yourself the time to practice and learn it, then follow your own rules. It’s a path of musical knowledge that I hope will inspire you as much as it has inspired me.

The Power in Logic Pro (Quick Pro Guides series)

Dot Bustelo’s signature approach to teaching Logic will get you up and running quickly. Once you’re started, she’ll help you move beyond the basics to discover a professional-level Logic workflow, taught through highly musical examples that expose Logic’s essential features and powerful production tools. You’ll find many of the tips, tricks, and insider techniques that powered Logic to its industry-leading status as the best tool for unleashing creativity in songwriting, composing, making beats, and remixing.

Dot Bustelo is an internationally recognized Logic consultant, lecturer, producer, and New York-based music industry marketing specialist.