Watch: Leonard Cohen – Everybody Knows

Watch the new book trailer for Leonard Cohen: Everybody Knows coming from Backbeat Books this September!

 

 

Leonard Cohen’s songs and poetry are defined by their emotional and intellectual intelligence. Lyrically potent, his records are full of romance, innuendo, and humor, and in performance his smoke-black vocal cords navigate the most sophisticated and arresting of melodies.

Illustrated with 200 rare black-and-white and color photographs and items of memorabilia and featuring the recollections and comments of those who have worked with him and are close to him, Leonard Cohen: Everybody Knows is a celebration of the life, music, and poetry of a unique artist and music legend.

Win a Zemaitis Custom Shop Metal Front Guitar

Contest Slide 770x420       Guitar Player and Rolling Stones Gear have teamed up to give you a chance to Win the Brands of the Rolling Stones! Now you can own some of the major brands of equipment the Rolling Stones played including Fender, Martin, Framus, Zemaitis, Gretsch, and Vox in this exciting new sweepstakes! They are also giving away the new book Rolling Stones Gear: All the Stones’ Instruments from Stage to Studio by Andy Babiuk and Greg Prevost. Check out this beautiful Zemaitis custom shop metal front guitar – you can win this! Andy and Greg of Rolling Stones Gear speak about the Stones’ love for Zemaitis in their book.

ENTER TONY ZEMAITIS

During his early days with the Faces, Ronnie played a Gibson SG, followed by a red Fender Stratocaster, and then a Danelectro, all of which were subsequently stolen. In the end, he resorted to personalized guitars made by the legendary British luthier Tony Zemaitis. “No one would dare steal his guitars because he makes them so individual,” Ronnie explained. “He plasters your name all over it.” Antanas Kazimeras Zemaitis (1935-2002), born in London England became an apprentice cabinetmaker when he was sixteen and went on to make high-quality furniture. After taking up guitar in the 1950s, he began building his own instruments. By the early 1960s, he had become an accomplished twelve-sting guitarist who shared stages with the likes of Long John Baldry and acoustic guitar wizard Davy Graham. Twelve-string guitars were a rare commodity in England, and Zemaitis made a name for himself building twelve-strings for Spencer Davis, Ralph McTell, and others.

Ron Wood was introduced to Zemaitis’s guitars in 1970 through Faces’ roadie Peter Buckland and commissioned Zemaitis to build two guitars for him. Zemaitis was known for his unique-looking electric guitars built with a metal plate on the top face of the guitar, which was intended to shield the guitar and reduce the hum produced by the pickups. The first Zemaitis Metal Front electric guitar was built for Tony McPhee of the Groundhogs; the second was built for Ronnie Wood. It had a single-cutaway mahogany body similar to a Les Paul and a mahogany neck with a bound ebony fingerboard. The 25-inch scale guitar was fitted with two humbucking pickups and a three-way toggle switch with two volume and two tone metal control knobs. To insure that each of his electrics was unique, Zemaitis teamed with his friend Danny O’Brien, a master gun engraver. Zemaitis handcrafted his own metal bridges, tailpieces, truss rod covers, pickup mounting rings, jack plates, rear electronics plates, and metal front facerplates, while O’Brien skillfully hand engraved each part, personalizing the guitar for the client. Ronnie Wood’s first Zemaitis Metal Front guitar also had two metal control knobs on the lower bout of the guitar.

The second electric guitar Zemaitis built to Wood’s specifications was an all-black, single-cutaway “Disc Front” model, named for a round metal plate on the face of the guitar that O’Brien engraved with a treasure map. The 25-inch scale guitar had a mahogany body and neck and an unbound ebony fingerboard with dot inlays that started at the first fret and became smaller as they went up. The guitar was fitted with three humbucking pickups and a combination of six volume and tone control knobs, a five-way selector switch, and a built-in preamp powered by a nine-volt battery. The handcrafted Zemaitis metal bridge, tailpiece, truss rod cover, jack plate, and rear electronics plate also were hand engraved by O’Brien.

Wood’s 1971 appearance with the Faces on Top of The Pops playing his Metal Front guitar sparked a huge interest in Zemaitis’s eye-catching work. It also inspired Zemaitis’s next creation, a Pearl Front guitar that he considered perfect for the stage because it would catch the light and change color. The guitar was similar to the Metal Front guitar, but, instead of the engraved metal plate, the top face of the guitar was inlaid with a mosaic of pearl and abalone. Wood received one of the first Zemaitis Pearl Front guitars, which was fitted with three single-coil pickups instead of humbuckers. In the latter stages of the Faces and during his early involvement with the Stones, Wood also owned a hardtail 1955 sunburst Fender Stratocaster, and a Dan Armstrong Plexi guitar which he made the mistake of giving to David Bowie. “I thought I could get another one,” Wood said with regret, “and I couldn’t.” His amplification at the time was strictly Ampeg SVTs, which were painted white while he was in the Faces.

A History of Southern Rock (and a closer look at Southbound)

Southbound, a new book by Scott Bomar, profiles the musicians, producers, record labels, and movers and shakers that defined Southern rock, including the Allmans, Skynyrd, the Marshall Tucker Band, Wet Willie, the Charlie Daniels Band, Elvin Bishop, the Outlaws, the Atlanta Rhythm Section, .38 Special, ZZ Top, and many others. Before you delve into this richly informative book however, you must first have an understanding of how the genre of Southern rock came to be. Here is an excerpt from Scott’s introduction that teaches us the history of Southern rock and how it fits into the rock ‘n’ roll scene as a whole.

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Rock and roll was born in the American South. Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Fats Domino, Buddy Holly, and the overwhelming majority of rock’s pioneering artists of the 1950s emerged from below the Mason-Dixon Line. But by the following decade, it was the British Invasion that assured rock music’s place as a permanent cultural fixture. Though Southern music was a major influence on the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and the myriad of British and American bands that rose up in their wake, the rock- and-roll revolution ultimately transcended any region. Instead, rock and roll belonged to an emerging national youth culture in need of visceral musical expression.

Ironically, the land that gave birth to rock and roll was perceived as the most resistant to the cultural changes that accompanied the soundtrack of the era. The South came to be viewed not as the spiritual homeland of rock’s roots but as a mysterious backwater that didn’t cotton to the ways of young rockers with shaggy hair. By the time potent new rock bands from the Southern states were rising to prominence in the early 1970s, their geographic origin was regarded as a peculiarity that necessitated the designation of a distinct subgenre. Southern rock became the battle flag under which long-haired kids from states like Florida, Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee, were able to rally.

As much as it was a new movement, so-called “Southern rock” was a renaissance. “We didn’t invent something that was already there,” Allman Brothers Band drummer Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson remarked in Candice Dyer’s Music from Macon. “If we supposedly invented ‘Southern rock,’ what the hell was Little Richard, Elvis—who was a disciple of Little Richard—Brenda Lee, and . . . Hank Williams? If ‘Jambalaya’ wasn’t Southern rock then tell me, what is? Don’t get me wrong—I’m very proud of our achievements, but, shit, Southern rock was going on fifty years before we came along.”

What Jaimoe’s comments illustrate is the ongoing reality that Elvis and Little Richard, both Southerners, are simply considered rock-and-rollers, while the Allman Brothers Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Marshall Tucker Band, Wet Willie, the Charlie Daniels Band, and the Outlaws are almost always identified as Southern rockers. While stereotypesof Southerners date back even further than Uncle Tom’s Cabin and the writings of Mark Twain, it was the proliferation of mass media in the 1960s that helped solidify a pervasive Southern caricature. Television programs— including The Andy Griffith Show, The Beverly Hillbillies, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Green Acres, and Hee Haw—portrayed white working-class Southerners as affable simpletons whose out- of-step-with-modern-times eccentricities were played for comedic effect. By the latter part of the 1960s, and into the 1970s, movies like In the Heat of the Night, Easy Rider, and Deliverance built on this image, adding frightening stereotypes of bigoted and menacing white Southerners that captured the popular imagination and helped cement an image of the South as a culturally deprived wasteland that was populated pri- marily by idiots and racists. As a result, the region’s artistic exports—including its rock music—were increasingly treated as some- thing distinct from the culture at large.

Sadly, some of the Southern stereotypes were not simply media inventions but reflections of real-life bigotry. Highly publicized battles of the civil rights movement, for instance, found high-profile politicians defiantly embracing racist, regressive attitudes that cast a shadow over the entire region. Over the years, the term “Southern rock” has suggested a number of connotations. For many, it simply suggests the authentic good-time working-class music that’s rooted in the Southern traditions of blues and country. It’s music that remains free from the pretensions of heavily produced performers who rely on theatrics and studio trickery over honest-to-God- shake-your-butt-’cause-it’s-Saturday-night rock and roll. For others, the term “Southern rock” has conjured images reminiscent of decidedly urban rock critic Lester Bangs’ char- acterization of the members of Lynyrd Skynyrd as “crude thunderstomper hillbillies whose market value rested primarily on the fact that they could play their instruments about like they could plant their fists in your teeth.”

Despite these negative stereotypes, the world of Southern rock was built on a rich foundation of musical traditions that covers a complex system of roots and branches, including the blues-heavy, jazz-tinged improvisations of the interracial Allman Brothers Band; the choreographed triple-guitar attack of Lynyrd Skynyrd; the country-oriented instru- mental subtleties of the Marshall Tucker Band; the lean, Stones-influenced boogie of Wet Willie; the lushly harmonious pop strains of the Atlanta Rhythm Section; or the foot-stompin’ stage show of the Charlie Daniels Band.

The majority of the players widely recognized as pillars of the Southern rock genre, however, have long grappled with the label and its associated presuppositions. “There’s something about the perception of how folks look at Southern people,” Marshall Tucker Band lead singer Doug Gray sighed in 2013. “The Marshall Tucker Band is Southern, but it ain’t about Honey Boo Boo, and it ain’t about making moonshine!”

Many of the musicians who are squeezed into the category insist the term is little more than a music industry invention. “‘Southern rock’ is an expression I don’t know if I ever fully understood,” mused Phil Walden, who helmed Capricorn Records, generally regarded as the quintessential label in the genre’s history. “I never really saw the close identity that was drawn between those bands,” he elaborated to Robert Gordon in 1995. “But I guess it’s just easier to heap everybody into one category.”

To a large degree, Walden benefited from the term by establishing a unique identity in the marketplace for his Macon, Georgia–based record label in the 1970s. “Around this time,” Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts explained to journalist Alan Paul, “everyone started calling us ‘Southern rock,’ which I always had real mixed feelings about, and which I don’t think any of us ever liked.” The Outlaws’ guitarist, Hughie Thomasson bristled at the categorization. “That’s a label that was stuck on us,” he insisted to author Marley Brant. “We didn’t put it on ourselves.”

The very diversity of the Southern rock landscape, however, has proven to be a compli- cating factor when it comes to defining what, exactly, Southern rock is, and who should fall into the category. For the purpose of this book, the term “Southern rock” refers to music that was rooted in a specific time, belonged to a particular place, was created by musicians with similar formative and cultural experiences, and served as a key expression of a uniquely countercultural movement in the South.

LISTEN: Mike Segretto on News Talk

 Mike Segretto, author of The Who FAQ called all the way over to Dublin for an interview on Moncrieff, a show on Ireland’s NewsTalk radio. Listen in!

 

>>LISTEN HERE<<

00114955Fifty years after Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, and Keith Moon made their first ruckus together onstage, the world is still fascinated with its greatest rock-and-roll band. Whether their music is popping up in TV commercials and the various incarnations of CSI or the remaining members are performing at the Super Bowl, the Olympics, or multitudinous charity events, the Who have never faded away. Yet while such artists as the Beatles, Bob Dylan, and Led Zeppelin have been pored over, flipped on their backs, and examined from every imaginable angle, the Who remain somewhat mysterious. Questions persist. Who were their most important influences, and which other bands were their most loyal followers? Did they really create the very first rock opera? What were their most important collaborations, gigs, solo projects, and phases? Where do they stand on politics, religion, and philanthropy? The answers to these questions don’t amount to mere trivia but create a clearer portrait of the enigma that is the Who.

Whether they were Mods or punk pioneers, rock Wagners, or a gang of guitar-smashing thugs, the Who are a band beyond categorization or comparison, a band that constantly poses new questions – and The Who FAQ digs deep to find the answers.

Win the Brands of the Rolling Stones

Contest Slide 770x420Guitar Player and Rolling Stones Gear have teamed up to give you a chance to Win the Brands of the Rolling Stones! Now you can own some of the major brands of equipment the Rolling Stones played including Fender, Martin, Framus, Zemaitis, Gretsch, and Vox in this exciting new sweepstakes! They are also giving away the new book Rolling Stones Gear: All the Stones’ Instruments from Stage to Studio by Andy Babiuk and Greg Prevost.

This giveaway is open to residents of the United States or the District of Columbia and you must be at least eighteen (18) years of age or older at the time of entry (see the official sweepstakes rules below). One lucky winner will be randomly selected after October 31, 2014.

Enter HERE

Listen: Andy Babiuk on BBC Radio Ulster

Andy Babiuk, one of the authors of Rolling Stones Gear, met up with Ralph McLean of BBC Ulster! Listen to them discuss all there is to know about Babiuk’s 9 year venture in writing this volume. He definitely is the ultimate expert on the Stones and their tools.

 

Project1>>LISTEN HERE<<

 

Rolling Stones Gear is the first book to historically document all of the Rolling Stones’ musical equipment. It’s also the story of the Rolling Stones, but with a new twist: their history as told through the instruments they used. This book covers not only the group’s personal background, but also every tour and studio session from their inception in 1962 to date, with detailed documentation illustrating what instruments and equipment were used during these periods. Every song recorded by the band, including demos and out-takes are also documented, with input from within the Stones’ ranks as well as from people who were involved with the band. This lavishly illustrated book contains hundreds of photographs and rare images, many of which have never been published, including the Rolling Stones’ actual guitars and equipment, which were specially photographed for this book and are seen here for the first time. Whether you are a musician, a Stones fan or just the casual reader, you will learn many new facts about the band from their monumental fifty-year existence.

Remembering Tommy Ramone

Tommy Ramone, the last surviving member of The Ramones, sadly passed away on July 11th. As the original drummer of the Ramones, Tommy died as a musical icon who helped to bring the punk-rock scene to the world’s forefront. The Ramones’ blasphemous lyrical content, their wild antics and their very very fast songs (the paces of which were in Tommy’s control) not only challenged the standards of rock n’ roll established in the “Golden Age” of the 50s, but created an entire scene of adolescent cynicism, rebellion, and irreverent fun that has remained relevant to musicians and fans alike to this day. The extent to which the Ramones have influenced the musical scene as a whole can never really be measured. If You Like The Ramones by Peter Aaron creates a vision that helps to capture the vast importance of this foursome. In light of Tommy’s death, Peter wrote this article for Chronogram. You’ll be missed, Tommy!

I Remember You: Tommy Ramone (1952-2014)

Peter Aaron on Tue, Jul 15

Forty years ago, a simple action that lasted less than one second and took place within a physical space not much bigger than a shoebox changed music forever. At that precise instant, Tommy Ramone’s sneaker-clad foot pressed down on his kick drum pedal for the very first time as he sat behind his band mates, Joey, Dee Dee, and Johnny Ramone, and the four played their first song together as the Ramones. The very instant Tommy hit that initial beat on his bass drum—an act that would provide the absolute nexus of the Ramones’ songs—he sent a shock wave through the universe that not only lit the fuse of the punk rock explosion that launched thousands of subsequent bands (and the bands that, they in turn, inspired), but also led to the creation of a D.I.Y. climate that has empowered people of myriad backgrounds and walks of life to go for it , and pursue their dreams. Over the weekend we got the crushing news that Tommy Ramone (AKA Tommy Erdelyi), a Phoenicia, New York, resident since 1993 and the last surviving original member of the Ramones, had died at the age of 65.

 

IYLramonesCoverThe moment cited at the start of this post took place in 1974 in the basement of the Art Garden, a Queens art gallery owned by Joey Ramone’s mother. At first, Joey had been the group’s drummer and Dee Dee was the lead singer as well as the bassist; Tommy was the band’s manager. But after it was determined that Joey was a lousy drummer and a much better singer than Dee Dee, things were shuffled. Joey stepped out front and Tommy, who had never before played drums in his life, got behind the kit to demonstrate the sound he had in his head. It all clicked immediately. History was born. In 1978, after five albums with the band Tommy left the quartet to concentrate on his career as a producer (in addition to the Ramones, he produced Talking Heads, the Replacements, and Redd Kross, among others), and was succeeded by Marky Ramone, Richie Ramone, and, very briefly, Blondie’s Clem Burke (as “Elvis Ramone”), all of whom did their best to adhere to the unwavering four-on-the-floor template laid down by Tommy.

I got to interview Tommy twice, once for Roll magazine for a piece about Uncle Monk, the bluegrass duo he had with his companion Claudia Tienan, and once for a Chronogram feature on Replacements bassist Tommy Stinson. On both occasions, he was incredibly thoughtful, very introspective, and super sweet. “Historically, I knew the Ramones would eventually be recognized,” he said when asked about his old group’s late-blooming recognition in the former article. “Because the band was just so different than anything else at the time [it began] and we influenced so many other bands. But how it’s just gotten bigger and bigger in terms of commercial popularity and how it keeps getting bigger all the time—that’s a really unexpected phenomenon.”

In 1979, I went to a Ramones record-signing event at Looney Tunes Records on Route 23 in Wayne, New Jersey (a pivotal place for me). In my haste, I forgot to bring a record for the Ramones to sign. Of the albums they had out at the time, Leave Home (1977), was the only one I didn’t own, so I bought a copy at the store and took it up to the table the Ramones were sitting at as they autographed records and posters for lines of kids. I didn’t think about the fact that although Tommy had played on that album, it was Marky who was actually the band’s drummer at the time of the in-store. (Who’s the pinhead now?) But Marky, gentleman that he is (or maybe he just didn’t care), went ahead and signed it anyway. I still have it, and had planned to seek out Tommy to have him sign it at last. But after cancelling an acoustic show he was supposed to play with the Sex Pistols’ Glen Matlock in Albany a couple of years back due to illness, he dropped out of sight; presumably, it was the same bile duct cancer that eventually took his life. Although reality now dictates that Tommy’s scrawled signature will never grace the tattered cover of my copy of Leave Home, his sonic and spiritual signature remain indelibly imprinted on it regardless, as they do on all of the Ramones’ music (even the stuff he doesn’t play on) and that of so many others.

Tommy and Claudia were Phoenicia part-timers and still kept a place in Queens, which, fittingly, is where Tommy passed last Friday. When I met him at an Uncle Monk show in Woodstock a few years back, as I consciously try to do when I meet other artists who have impacted my life, I made sure to look straight into his eyes and tell him thank you, for what he had done. Now that Tommy’s joined the other original Ramones at that ultimate punk gig in the Great Beyond, I’m very glad I had the opportunity to do that.

Remembering Johnny Winter

The spectacularly influential and forever intriguing blues guitarist, Johnny Winter, sadly passed away on Wednesday. Rolling Stone magazine has called Johnny Winter one of the greatest guitar players of all time. Ripped off and beaten down by unscrupulous managers, strung out, living the extreme highs and extreme lows of an uncompromising musician, Johnny was a true rock ‘n’ roll survivor. Winter’s long career was chronicled by Mary Lou Sullivan in her Backbeat publication, Raisin’ Cain: The Wild and Raucous Story of Johnny Winter, which was mentioned in the Rolling Stone article featured below.

The Lion in Johnny Winter: A Tribute to the Guitar Icon

by David Marchese

Legendary blues musician Johnny Winter died in his hotel room in Zurich, Switzerland, on July 16th at 70 years old. There are plenty of reasons why that’s notable — Winter was one of the first blues rock guitar virtuosos, releasing a string of popular and fiery albums in the late Sixties and early Seventies, becoming an arena-level concert draw in the process — but it’s the barest facts that remain the most inspiring. Johnny Winter, from little Beaumont, Texas, afflicted with albinism and 20/400 eyesight in one eye and 20/600 in the other, made an iconic life for himself by playing the blues.

What are the odds of that story coming true? What levels of self-belief, resilience and talent did it take to transform those biographical details — one could easily imagine, say, Thomas Pynchon conjuring them for a character (The whitest blues guitarist! Named Johnny Winter!) — into the stuff of a legendary career? As fellow blues guitar great Michael Bloomfield said when introducing Winter at a 1968 show at Manhattan’s Fillmore East, “This is the baddest motherfucker.” Winter was that, no doubt, but also a testament to the idea that with a lot of skill and dedication and more than a little luck, music can open any door.

In Mary Lou Sullivan’s entertaining biography, Raisin’ Cain, Winter, whose brother was multi-instrumentalist Edgar Winter (of “Frankenstein” fame), explained that, “Growin’ up in school, I really got the bad end of the deal. People teased me and I got in a lot of fights. I was a pretty bluesy kid.” That alienation, he believed, gave him a kinship with the black blues musicians he idolized. “We both,” he explained, “had a problem with our skin being the wrong color.”
It’s probably overly romantic to say that one can hear any sort of outsider’s howl in Winter’s playing, which first came to wider attention via a 1968 Rolling Stone article that praised him for some of the most “gutsiest, fluid guitar you ever heard,” but at its best, there’s a beautifully articulated flamboyance to his music. Faster and flashier than his blues god contemporary Eric Clapton, Winter’s musicianship — a hyperactive, high-octane intensity was his great blues innovation — had the electric flair of someone who was determined to take charge of how he was seen by others. It was as if his playing (and his gutsy singing) was a challenge to audiences. Okay, you’re looking at me? Then watch this.

As a concert draw and big-seller, Winter peaked in by the mid-Seventies. (New listeners should start with 1969’s Second Winter; this year’s True To The Blues compilation is comprehensive.) But stepping out of stardom’s spotlight gave him the opportunity to do his most valuable work, as a steward to the music that changed his life. Starting in 1977, Winter produced a trio of swaggering, earthy albums for blues genius Muddy Waters, of which Hard Again is the first and best. Those albums reconnected Waters with his own greatness — Muddy’s prior Seventies albums had been uninspired — and delivered him a late-in-life critical and commercial triumph. After Waters died in 1983, Winter, who by then had already inspired followers like his fellow Texan Stevie Ray Vaughan, settled into a journeyman’s role, releasing albums at a steady pace and touring even more frequently than that. It wasn’t always an easy ride— there were struggles with addiction and duplicitous management — but it was as good, and honorable, as a blues musician can ask for. They wouldn’t be called the blues if everything was rosy.

When he wasn’t on the road, Winter, who, it must be said, cut a striking figure on-stage up through his last gigs, spent his time with his wife at home in rural Connecticut, and was able to bask in the respect of fellow musicians, a testament to the truth that if you give your being to the music you love, the music can turn that being into a remarkable life. His now-posthumous upcoming release, Step Back, is due out in September and features appearances from Clapton, ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons, Ben Harper, Dr. John, Aerosmith’s Joe Perry and others. They all knew what Winter meant.

Towards the end of Raisin’ Cain, Winter is asked how he’d liked to be remembered. He answered, simply, “As a good blues player.”

For more, here is biographer Mary Lou Sullivan being interviewed shortly after Winter’s passing.

Norm Stockton and the Art of Groove

While there are bass guitar instruction books everywhere, none of them seem to tell you exactly how to “make the phone ring” as a bass artist. Norm Stockton, merited bass musician and instructor, understands that that adding personality, emotion and soul to bass music is the most important skill a player can have – he calls this the ability to groove. Norm teaches his students how to transcend the more technical components of the bass to help them create a piece of music that draws the audience in, especially in a setting where multiple instruments are playing together.

“If you don’t already have it,” Norm says in his book, The Worship Bass Book, “I want to encourage you to develop and nurture a passion for the groove. Getting right in there with the drummer and locking down a really solid and great feel is the most fulfilling musical experience a bassist can have, and that is the primary thing that other musicians pursue in a bass player.”

The Worship Bass Book is a fun and practical book that covers the essentials of bass playing, including phrasing, style, drum and bass synergy, and solo arranging. It is a comprehensive look at all things bass in a digestible, yet broadly informative format.

And what’s more, Norm never stops teaching! He has his very own instructional website called the Art of Groove which offers advice, not only about playing the bass, but on how to market yourself as a musician, how to broaden your musical horizons, and how to get the most out of your instrument. Learn how to groove with the free lesson below, and be sure  to grab a copy of Norm’s book.

 

 

 

Happy Birthday, Mr. B!

Today would have been the legendary Billy Eckstine’s 100th birthday! Yesterday, Tom Vitale of All Things Considered did a great segment on the talented and suave musician in which Cary Ginell, author of Mr. B: The Music and Life of Billy Eckstine, is featured. Please enjoy the slideshow below!

 

 

 

Audio courtesy of NPR

Images featured from Mr. B